Women and children wash on the edge of Lake Tanganyika  in the village of Nkongwa, Tanzania. Washing directly into the lake introduces chemicals and pollutants to the community's main source of drinking water. This village does not have a beach management unit, which would restrict  washing to 15 meters from the shore.   In Western Tanzania’s Greater Mahale Ecosystem (GME), more than 50,000 women, men and children live on the remote, eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika, and a total of 590,000 live in the districts encompassing the whole of the lakeside and inland GME. The population is expected to grow at 4.8% each year.
Tuungane_16-08-23_0833 Women and children wash on the edge of Lake Tanganyika in the village of Nkongwa, Tanzania. Washing directly into the lake introduces chemicals and pollutants to the community's main source of drinking water. This village does not have a beach management unit, which would restrict washing to 15 meters from the shore. In Western Tanzania’s Greater Mahale Ecosystem (GME), more than 50,000 women, men and children live on the remote, eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika, and a total of 590,000 live in the districts encompassing the whole of the lakeside and inland GME. The population is expected to grow at 4.8% each year. © © Ami Vitale

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Seventy percent (70%) of the world is covered by water, yet less than one percent (1%) of it is accessible and drinkable.

Many places in the world do not have enough water to meet their daily needs; in other places the water supply is contaminated from pollution and sediment. The availability and quality of that water supply depend heavily on protecting and conserving water at its source—the rivers, lakes, wetlands, forests and other ecosystems that collect, filter and transport water to people.

That's why The Weather Channel, IBM, and The Nature Conservancy are teaming up to help provide clean water for those in need. To highlight the water scarcity issue facing our planet, The Weather Channel has launched an awareness initiative called Forecast: Change. Meanwhile, the IBM Corporate Service Corps is also working closely with TNC to develop and enhance clean water solutions and operations.

As the planet warms, we see an increase in extreme severe weather, flood and drought, diminishing the earth’s capacity to sustain clean water. Climate change equals water change."

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