About Us

Who We Are

A professional climber climbing the side of a mountain
A rope technician works to remove invasive pine trees from the greater Cape Town region in South Africa. TNC works with local organizations to support these water-saving efforts. © Roshni Lodhia

The Nature Conservancy is a global environmental nonprofit working to create a world where people and nature can thrive.

Founded in the U.S. through grassroots action in 1951, The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has grown to become one of the most effective and wide-reaching environmental organizations in the world. Thanks to more than a million members and the dedicated efforts of our diverse staff and over 400 scientists, we impact conservation in 76 countries and territories: 37 by direct conservation impact and 39 through partners.

Our Mission:

To conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends.

Our Vision:

A world where the diversity of life thrives, and people act to conserve nature for its own sake and its ability to fulfill our needs and enrich our lives.

By the Numbers

  • Icon of a globe

    70+

    We impact conservation in over 70 countries and territories.

  • Two fish

    100+

    We operate more than 100 marine conservation projects.

  • Icon of a microscope.

    400+

    We have more than 400 scientists on staff.

  • Icon of a garden.

    125M+

    We have protected more than 125 million acres of land.

Highlights From Our Work

monarch
Monarch_Charles_Larry Monarch butterfly. © Charles Larry
lush tongass forest
Riparian old-growth forest Landscape of a riparian old growth forest near Thorne Bay, Alaska. © Chris Crisman
wind turbine
Block Island Wind Farm In 2010, Tricia Jedele helped develop the RI Ocean Special Area Management Plan, the first federally approved ocean plan for offshore wind in the U.S. © Ayla Fox
fire crew
Lake Alexander prescribed burn Firefighters conducting a prescribed spring burn at the Lake Alexander Preserve in central Minnesota. © Jennifer Linehan/TNC
british columbia
Aerial view of the Holmes River, British Columbia, Canada. © Shane Kalyn
woman in mangrove forest
Harvest Time A member of the Mtangawanda Women's Association harvesting propagules from mangroves in Lamu County, Kenya. © Roshni Lodhia
monarch
Monarch_Charles_Larry Monarch butterfly. © Charles Larry

Celebrating a Cultural Icon

The iconic Monarch butterfly holds great ecological and cultural significance across North America. Their stunning appearance and incredible 3,000 mile migration across the continent have inspired myths and celebrations. Monarch populations are declining. Their numbers are threatened by dwindling native plant populations and climate change, which alters their migration patterns. TNC partners with local communities across the country, including in East Chicago, to protect and celebrate the Monarch.

lush tongass forest
Riparian old-growth forest Landscape of a riparian old growth forest near Thorne Bay, Alaska. © Chris Crisman

5 Ways We Conserve Quickly and Durably

We have to work quickly to conserve nature and ensure that the work we do endures. Helping to launch a sustainable tuna company. Raising coral embryos to serve as marine habitats. Partnering with local communities to conserve important habitats. In these ways and more, we're providing the next generation with the tools they need to build a sustainable future.

wind turbine
Block Island Wind Farm In 2010, Tricia Jedele helped develop the RI Ocean Special Area Management Plan, the first federally approved ocean plan for offshore wind in the U.S. © Ayla Fox

Saving Energy And Fish

When we design with nature in mind, we accomplish more. Like making thriving marine habitats out of offshore wind turbines. They fight climate change and can act as artificial reefs. TNC scientists are helping research materials and designs that will properly anchoring offshore wind turbines while also supporting marine life and biodiversity.

fire crew
Lake Alexander prescribed burn Firefighters conducting a prescribed spring burn at the Lake Alexander Preserve in central Minnesota. © Jennifer Linehan/TNC

Burning to Keep Forests in Check

Fire can be a force of restoration, and many habitats need them. Wisconsin Oak trees rely on fire to burn away plants that would shade them out. In grasslands, native plants grow and thrive in the aftermath of fires. Controlled burns even decrease severity of wildfires. To help maintain native plant populations, we partner with local organizations and Indigenous leaders to perform safe controlled burns.

british columbia
Aerial view of the Holmes River, British Columbia, Canada. © Shane Kalyn

Reducing Emissions with Nature

Technology will take us a long way in reducing carbon emissions, but we must also remove carbon from the atmosphere. Luckily, nature is fantastic at storing carbon, if we give it the chance. Natural solutions, like protecting and managing forests and wetlands, can store 1/3 of the carbon the world needs to avoid climate change's worst impacts. Hear from a TNC scientist on how protecting nature protects us.

woman in mangrove forest
Harvest Time A member of the Mtangawanda Women's Association harvesting propagules from mangroves in Lamu County, Kenya. © Roshni Lodhia

Kenya’s Mangrove Guardians

Mangrove forests—critical parts of Kenya’s ecosystems, cultures and local economies—are threatened by logging and pollution. TNC and partners developed a program empowering women to protect and restore their community's mangroves. The program supports women in creating sustainable economic opportunity.

Aerial view of trees in a forest, a dirt road, and the water's edge.
Falltime Gradients The gradient of colors in the fall in Northern California. Evergreens and deciduous plants create a beautiful gradient of color as the seasons change. © © Sevag Mehterian/TNC Photo Contest 2018