Maine

Join Maine

A CAMPAIGN FOR CLIMATE ACTION

A montage of video showing forests and rivers and ocean.
Penobscot River West Branch of the Penobscot River and tributaries as it winds to the southeast of Mount Katahdin. © Bridget Besaw
colorful logo shapes like Maine
Join Maine A Campaign for Climate Action

Our ability to face climate change is dependent on our ability to join together. In that, as ever, we can learn from nature—that our differences are our strength, our connections will endure, and nothing exists alone.

TOGETHER, we can unite scientific learning with proven practices to reduce and manage the effects of the climate crisis.

TOGETHER, we can build a future that is just, equitable, and strengthened by the diversity of plant, animal, and human life.

TOGETHER, we can connect our local initiatives to the search for global climate solutions.

TOGETHER, we can restore the connections between land, river, and sea that sustain the resilient ecosystems we need to protect life on a warming planet.

Join the Effort—Join Maine

A shared vision can bring a brighter future if we act now, together.

Act Now

$85,000,000 funds toward our goal

Progress: 65.3%

Goal of $130,000,000

Join Maine Campaign Goals Breakdown

Click on the initiatives slice to learn more.

Initiatives 72

  • Forests 40
  • Rivers 8
  • Oceans 7
  • Air 6
  • Community 11

Core Support 12

Deferred Giving 11

Global 5

Fifth Item 0

A women kneels on the forest floor writing in a notepad
Taking Note Identifying species during a bioblitz at Boundary Mountains Preserve. © Kira Bennett Hamilton/TNC
Two women take measurements of a culvert.
Data Capture Measuring one of thousands of road-stream crossings in Maine. © Tim Paul
A man on a boat holds a big fish.
Gulf's Bounty A fisherman and his catch aboard the Safe Haven © David Hills
A charging unit is plugged into a red car.
Plugged In An electric vehicle gets a charge. © Tim Paul/TNC
Two young people look at a grasshopper on a leaf.
Community Young people explore the natural world © Robert Bukaty
Two people with nets wade in a stream.
Monitoring Scientists collect fish via electric fishing in a pond near Fougamou base, Gabon. © Roshni Lodhia
A women kneels on the forest floor writing in a notepad
Taking Note Identifying species during a bioblitz at Boundary Mountains Preserve. © Kira Bennett Hamilton/TNC

Forests

Safeguarding Shelter for Wildlife & People

Our forests are an incredible natural climate solution. In addition to providing clean water, hosting our recreation, and powering our economy with wood products, they capture over three million metric tons of carbon from the atmosphere each year. TNC is leveraging ground-breaking science to respond. We’re identifying a network of unique locations that can withstand climate impacts, including vitally important Maine forests. This scientific learning drives our conservation planning and is a key strategy in our work to address climate change.

Two women take measurements of a culvert.
Data Capture Measuring one of thousands of road-stream crossings in Maine. © Tim Paul

Rivers

Fostering the Flow Between Land & Sea

Constricted waterways block fish and wildlife and put us all at risk of flooding from climate change. Maine rivers form a 75,000-mile network and support biodiversity along our riparian arteries, providing protection for many rare, threatened, and endangered species. Aging dams and inadequate road crossings constrict these courses. By restoring free-flowing rivers and streams, we will increase the resilience of these networks and foster one of the most connected, intact river systems in the nation.

A man on a boat holds a big fish.
Gulf's Bounty A fisherman and his catch aboard the Safe Haven © David Hills

Oceans

Stimulating a Sea Change in Fishery Management

The Gulf of Maine is warming faster than 99 percent of the world’s oceans. It is one of the most complex and productive marine environments on the planet—but it is threatened by chronic overfishing, habitat loss, and the effects of a changing climate. TNC partners with fishermen to develop more sustainable fishing practices and to collect better data about how species are adapting to a warming Gulf. As conditions become even more unpredictable, these partnerships will help protect this vital habitat and the communities that depend on it.

A charging unit is plugged into a red car.
Plugged In An electric vehicle gets a charge. © Tim Paul/TNC

Air

Curbing Carbon Through Policy & Practice

Reducing the amount of greenhouse gases we send into the atmosphere is up to us. Maine has the highest carbon emissions and spends the most on energy per capita in New England. That’s why TNC partners with policymakers and leaders to shape bold, innovative approaches that reduce emissions in Maine—and beyond. Collaborating to build public support for these initiatives helps ensure their continued success. Our priorities include advancing clean energy, incentivizing energy-efficient practices, and setting ambitious emissions-reduction targets.

Two young people look at a grasshopper on a leaf.
Community Young people explore the natural world © Robert Bukaty

Community

Planning with Partners to Face the Future

Hotter summers, warmer winters, shifting seasons, stronger storms—these changes affect natural and human communities alike. For solutions to be sustainable, they must address the needs of both. Across the state, TNC digs into work with communities and leaders at every level, strengthening our collective response to climate change through innovative policies, cutting-edge science, and direct action.

Two people with nets wade in a stream.
Monitoring Scientists collect fish via electric fishing in a pond near Fougamou base, Gabon. © Roshni Lodhia

Global

Maine Has Insights to Share & Lessons to Learn

Maine is an exceptional place to plan and prepare for climate change. Our extraordinary ecosystems provide opportunities to lessen the extent and adapt to the consequences of this escalating crisis, and our local efforts are vitally connected to the search for global solutions. Our team has been applying the expertise we built working to restore rivers, developing relationships with Wabanaki partners, and creating water funds to projects all over the world.

Supporter Stories

Hear from four TNC Maine supporters about how–and why–they are making this work possible.

More of Your Impact

  • green tree icon

    Resilient and Connected

    Explore the importance of Boundary Mountains Preserve with this interactive storymap. Click into the Storymap

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    Restored Fish Passage

    See how your support benefits people and nature in central Maine. Watch the Video

  • blue droplet icon

    Sebago Clean Waters

    This collaboration protects forests and drinking water for 1/6 of Maine households. See How it Works

  • An illustration of a tree and a stream

    More Maine Stories

    You can make a difference in so many ways. Read the Stories

A view of mountains with dark clouds overhead.
Brewing Storm View from the Trout Mountain Preserve fire tower. © Phoebe Parker