Stories in Maine

Fostering the Flow Between Land and Sea

In Maine, TNC is pioneering unique strategies to address the effects of climate change through reconnecting rivers and waterways.

Underwater view of a school of fish swimming in a current.

Our state is home to some of the healthiest and most resilient watersheds in the eastern U.S. Maine rivers form a 75,000-mile network and support biodiversity along our riparian arteries, providing protection for many rare, threatened and endangered species.

Aging dams and inadequate road crossings constrict these courses. In addition to dividing critical habitat for native species, they put human communities at increased risk of flooding from climate change. By restoring free-flowing rivers and streams, we will increase the resilience of these networks and foster one of the most connected, intact river systems in the nation.

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What River Restoration Success Looks Like

By restoring free-flowing rivers and streams, we will increase the resilience of these networks and foster one of the most connected, intact river systems in the nation. As part of our Join Maine campaign, we are working to ensure these critical successes by 2024:

  • Blue icon line drawing of stream next to trees.

    2,000 Miles

    of Maine rivers and streams are protected and reconnected.

  • Blue icon line drawing of fish with bubles above.

    15 Million

    sea-run fish return to Maine’s rivers each year.

When Rivers Return See how this work benefits nature and people in Maine.
A booklet with a prescribed fire fighter on the cover sits in a blue background.
Join Maine The Nature Conservancy in Maine © TNC

To achieve these goals, we are working to raise $10 million specifically for our work in this area, including $8 million in support from people like you and $2 million in public and partner funding. Learn more about our conservation goals and Join Maine.

Water cascades over rocks in a stream in a forest.
Connected A free-flowing stream in Bradley Sunkhaze Preserve. © Phoebe Parker