Red Rock State Park, Tehachapi, California
Mojave Desert Red Rock State Park, Tehachapi, California © Ian Shive

All Planned Giving Options

Life Insurance Policy Gifts

A Gift for Your Values

Naming The Nature Conservancy as a beneficiary of your life insurance policy is easy and can help protect our most important lands and waters.

How It Works

You can name TNC as primary beneficiary of your life insurance policy or as contingent beneficiary should your other beneficiaries not survive you.

Please note: You can also irrevocably donate your paid-up life insurance policy - please contact us directly about making this type of gift.

Here's the process:

  1. Provide now for a future gift by naming TNC as beneficiary of a policy insuring your life.
  2. At death the benefits pass to TNC free of federal estate tax and are applied to the program designated by the donor.

Benefits

  • Execute this estate planning strategy with little paperwork. Change your mind and beneficiaries at any time.
  • Remove an asset from your potential gross taxable estate, saving on taxes in the future.
  • Make a significant gift from income instead of capital.
  • Build your future conservation goals.
  • Gain personal satisfaction in providing for the causes that matter to you most.

Can It Work for You?

A life insurance gift might be for you if:

  • You are a younger donor who wants to make a significant gift.
  • You have an estate that won't have substantial assets to distribute to non-family members.

More Information

Example: You bought a life insurance policy to protect your family. Your family no longer needs this protection and you decide to name TNC as the beneficiary of the policy. After your lifetime, the policy benefits will go to TNC to help protect critical lands and waters.


We wanted to ensure our money went to the causes we cared most about. It was simply a matter of knowing what you care about and putting that down on paper.

ALL INTERNAL RIGHTS, LIMITED EXTERNAL RIGHTS. December 2013. The Mad Island Marsh Preserve protects 7,063 acres, including rare tallgrass coastal prairies. Every winter, birders flock to preserves and parks to tally species and take part in the Christmas Bird Count, a friendly competition that pits teams from across the contitent against each other. For five years, the team at The Nature Conservancy's Mad Island Marsh Preserve has come out ahead. Photo credit: © Karine Aigner
Mad Island Marsh ALL INTERNAL RIGHTS, LIMITED EXTERNAL RIGHTS. December 2013. The Mad Island Marsh Preserve protects 7,063 acres, including rare tallgrass coastal prairies. Every winter, birders flock to preserves and parks to tally species and take part in the Christmas Bird Count, a friendly competition that pits teams from across the contitent against each other. For five years, the team at The Nature Conservancy's Mad Island Marsh Preserve has come out ahead. Photo credit: © Karine Aigner © Karine Aigner