Sanderlings (Calidris alba) use oyster reefs for foraging at Alabama Port.
Sanderlings Sanderlings (Calidris alba) use oyster reefs for foraging at Alabama Port. © Beth Maynor Young

Stories in Alabama

Alabama’s Living Shorelines

Since 2005 The Nature Conservancy and our partners have worked with stakeholders to install more than 9 miles of reef at 17 locations across the Alabama Gulf Coast. This work, done in part with the support of 1,868 volunteers, represents more than $28 million spent to protect and restore the coast, and has partly supported 152 jobs at two projects tracked in Alabama. Another four projects, encompassing almost three miles, have been approved at a cost of approximately $31 million for construction in the next couple of years.

Read our full report

Read more about ten living shoreline projects:

  • Living Shorelines project in Alabama Port

    Alabama Port

    The project created 0.4 miles of oyster reefs and protected approximately 4 acres of marsh habitat, while limiting erosion along approximately 4,471 feet of shoreline.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project in Arlington Cove

    Arlington Cove

    Five reef segments were placed approximately 100 ft from the shoreline, and restored over .02 acre of reef breakwater and living shoreline habitat.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Beckwith Camp

    Beckwith Camp

    Twenty-three reef pyramids were placed approximately 40 ft from the shoreline, and restored more than .1 acre of breakwater and living shoreline habitat.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Coffee Island

    Coffee Island

    This project created oyster reefs that protected approximately 10 acres of seagrass and marsh habitat, while limiting erosion along approximately 1.02 miles of shoreline.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Fort Morgan

    Fort Morgan

    These were the first projects completed by The Nature Conservancy in Alabama involving private landowners who wanted to find alternative solutions to traditional shoreline armoring to help protect their shorelines.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Fowl River

    Fowl River

    Two projects serve as demonstration sites and provide real-world examples of nature-based shoreline protection to interested stakeholders, like land owners, regulatory agencies, and local municipalities.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Helen Wood Park

    Helen Wood Park

    The Nature Conservancy, working with its partners, placed 1,100 ft of reef segments about 100 ft from the shoreline to protect the natural shoreline.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Pelican Point

    Pelican Point

    In 2013, The Nature Conservancy placed four reef segments about 80 ft from the shoreline, restoring over .1 acre of reef breakwater and living shoreline habitat.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Swift Tract

    Swift Tract

    At about 5 miles in length, the Swift Tract shoreline represents one of the longest continuous stretches of undeveloped shoreline in Mobile Bay. This project restored over 3/4 acre of reef breakwater and living shoreline habitat.

    DOWNLOAD
  • Living Shorelines project at Taylor's Riverview Park

    Taylor's Riverview Park

    Forty-one reef pyramids were placed approximately 10 feet from the shoreline, restoring over .02 acres of reef breakwater and living shoreline habitat.

    DOWNLOAD