Places We Protect

Wetipquin Pond

Maryland / DC

Moss and fallen leaves float in a small pool of water.
Wetipquin Pond Wetipquin Pond is an unusually pristine site found in a large contiguous wooded tract. © TNC

One of Maryland’s rarest natural communities.

Overview

Description

Wetipquin Pond is a Delmarva bay. This type of bay is a non-tidal, seasonally flooded freshwater wetland and is one of Maryland’s rarest natural communities.

These bays occur only on the Delmarva Peninsula, typically along the backbone of the peninsula where soils are poorly drained.

Seasonal flooding and saturated soils discourage many tree species from growing and create meadow-like openings dominated by grasses and sedges, providing habitat for rare plants like pond spice, purple bladderwort, Torrey’s mountain mint and reticulated nutrush and the nationally-rare creeping St. John’s wort.

TNC owns 40 acres protecting the pond and surrounding forest. Because the pond is remote and largely surrounded by the State of Maryland land, it has needed limited ecological management to date.

Because of the fragile ecology of Delmarva bays, Wetipquin Pond is only open to scientific research with prior permission from TNC. Thank you for your understanding and help in protecting this important part of Maryland’s natural heritage.

Access

CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC

Closed to the public to protect the fragile ecology of the Delmarva bays.

Location

Wicomico County, MD

Map with marker: Hybrid road and topographical map showing an orange pointer centered west of Salisbury, MD.

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The Nature Conservancy owns nearly 1,500 preserves covering more than 2.5 million acres across all 50 states. These lands protect wildlife and natural systems, serve as living laboratories for innovative science and connect people to the natural world.

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