The Prothonotary Warbler got its name from the bright yellow robes worn by papal clerks, known as prothonotaries, in the Roman Catholic church.
Prothonotary warbler The Prothonotary Warbler got its name from the bright yellow robes worn by papal clerks, known as prothonotaries, in the Roman Catholic church. © Matthew Wroblewski / flickr Creative Commons CC by 2.0

Places We Protect

Frank M. Ewing / Robinson Neck Preserve

Maryland

A birder's delight of undisturbed waterfowl habitat and a sanctuary for bald eagles.

COVID-19 Update (March 30, 2020)

TNC’s public preserves in Maryland remain open. We ask all visitors to follow current health and safety precautions, including guidance from the Governor’s Stay-at-Home order issued March 30, 2020, the Maryland Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), including maintaining a distance of at least 6 feet from others (social distancing).

Parking may be limited at many of our preserves. If parking areas are full, please plan to return to the preserve another day.

If you choose to visit a TNC preserve, please follow preserve access guidelines, and check back here for updates as the current situation is changing rapidly.

Thank you for helping us in our efforts to protect our visitors’ health and well-being.


Established in 1977 by a generous donation from Frank M. Ewing, Robinson Neck is a birder's delight. The preserve's brackish marshes are of extraordinary ecological value for wintering and nesting waterfowl, spawning fish, sediment control and nutrient production.

Many such brackish bay marshes have been drained or filled for farmland and development. Nearby upland forests provide an important buffer in the protection of these marshes and the entire Chesapeake Bay.

By protecting these habitats, we can help sustain the natural systems that are the lifeblood of the Chesapeake Bay.

Historic Connections

An historic family cemetery dating from the early 19th century is nestled within Robinson Neck Preserve. Flanked by encroaching marsh, the cemetery is facing a fate that is predicted to become commonplace on the Eastern Shore—within the next 100 years, the stones will likely be underwater.

TNC Project Manager, and life-long Eastern Shore resident, Joe Fehrer has undertaken a survey of the cemetery. His goal is to have it added to the inventory of historic places through the Maryland Historic Trust.

What to See

Established in 1977 by a generous donation from Frank M. Ewing, Robinson Neck is a birder's delight. Keep an eye out for bald eagles, osprey and marsh hawks. 

May is the best time for birdwatching, when migration is at a peak; summer brings a proliferation of flowering plants and marsh grasses; fall brings migrating birds, highlighted by warblers and puddle ducks.

This mature forest also provides ideal habitat for the federally endangered Delmarva fox squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus).  Fox squirrels are larger and have bushier tails than common gray squirrels. Don't be disappointed if you don't see one; they are much more elusive than our common friends.

POISON IVY ALERT : If you are highly allergic to poison ivy, we recommend that you avoid this preserve altogether.

Perched prothonotary warbler
Frank M Ewing Robinson Neck Preserve
An undisturbed waterfowl and upland habitat, the preserve affords a sanctuary for the bald eagle and is an exceptional black duck nesting location.

Frank M. Ewing / Robinson Neck Preserve The preserve is a birder's delight, where one finds undisturbed waterfowl habitat and a sanctuary for bald eagles.

Download an Audio Tour

Planning a visit to Frank M. Ewing Robinson Neck Preserve? Before your trip, download our self-guided audio tour to your handheld device. It's like having a naturalist in your pocket!

Step 1: Download the Robinson Neck audio tour map (pdf). This map will help identify which audio tracks to play based on your location on the trail, so make sure to take a copy with you on your trip.



Step 2: Download and save the mp3 audio files to your handheld device. Play the corresponding track when you reach a waypoint along the trail. Listen to them all or pick & choose based on your interests!

Tour Stops / Audio Files (mp3)

1. Robinson Neck Introduction

2. Tree Clearing with Pond

3. Wildlife at the Trail Gate

4. Ponds on Left and Right

5. Cattail opening

6. Start of Boardwalk / Delmarva Fox Squirrel

7. Bench Near Pond / Human Habitation

8. At Post 7 / Bayberry Bush

9. Bench View at Post 10

10. Biodiversity at End of Trail

11. Sika deer call