New Point Comfort Light is the third-oldest surviving light in the Chesapeake Bay and the tenth-oldest in the United States.
New Point Comfort New Point Comfort Light is the third-oldest surviving light in the Chesapeake Bay and the tenth-oldest in the United States. © Dana Blackmer Photography

Places We Protect

New Point Comfort Preserve

Virginia

An ADA-accessible boardwalk and observation deck provides a view of Mobjack Bay and the historic New Point Comfort lighthouse.

Strategically located on a peninsula jutting into the Chesapeake Bay, New Point Comfort is a key stopover point on the Atlantic Flyway for neo-tropical songbirds and other migratory birds. Here you'll find three major natural habitats: tidal salt marsh, maritime forest, and sandy beach.

Why TNC Selected This Site

New Point Comfort was acquired by TNC as part of our efforts to protect Chesapeake Bay habitats.

Conditions

An ADA-accessible boardwalk and observation deck extends over salt marsh, providing a view of Mobjack Bay and the historic New Point Comfort lighthouse.

The roadside running between forest and marsh offers additional opportunities for birding, which is best during spring and fall migrations.

There are no restrooms.

What to See: Animals

Migratory birds such as herons, osprey, hawks, willets, terns, brown pelicans and skimmers are frequently sighted. New Point Comfort also provides habitat for some 200 species of birds and the northeastern beach tiger beetle, which is federally listed as a threatened species.

New Point Comfort
This preserve in Eastern Virginia is a key stopover point on the Atlantic Flyway for neo-tropical songbirds and other migratory birds.

New Point Comfort An ADA-accessible boardwalk and observation deck extends over salt marsh, providing a view of Mobjack Bay and the historic New Point Comfort lighthouse.

We invite you to experience and enjoy preserves where we provide public access, but remember that every visitor has an impact. Please follow our visitation guidelines to protect yourself and nature.

  • Preserves are open to the public during daylight hours. 
  • Passive recreation such as walking, bird watching, and photography is welcomed. 

 THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES ARE NOT ALLOWED:

  • Bringing dogs onto the preserve
  • Picking flowers, mushrooms, etc.
  • Removing rocks or other parts of the landscape
  • Smoking
  • Camping
  • Fires or cookouts
  • Driving motorized vehicles, including ATV’s, except on designated access roads
  • Biking, except at Brownsville Preserve
  • Fishing, trapping or hunting, except as otherwise posted
  • Horseback riding
  • Feeding wildlife
  • Releasing animals or introducing plants
  • Disposing of trash or other waste, including biodegradable materials

TO MINIMIZE YOUR IMPACT, WE ASK THAT YOU PLEASE ALSO OBSERVE THE FOLLOWING:

  • Stay on trails.
  • Avoid walking in wet, boggy areas.
  • Inspect pant legs and shoes to remove seeds before entering and when leaving the preserve. Failure to do so could introduce invasive weeds to new locations.
  • If you flush a ground nesting bird, stop and avoid walking near the nest area.
  • Observe all posted signs.
  • Please do not remove stakes, signs, flagging, tape or similar objects. These may be markers for a research project.
  • Please do not trespass on private property adjacent to preserves.

For your own comfort and enjoyment, come prepared. Wear comfortable shoes for hiking, pack rain gear, and wear long pants with socks over them to protect yourself from ticks and poison ivy. Always remember to bring water, as dehydration is a serious year-round threat.

If you observe any illegal activity on a preserve such as ATV use, do not confront the offenders yourself. However, do feel free to call local law enforcement.

Enjoy your visit and please report any problems you encounter at a preserve to the Virginia Chapter at 434-295-6106.