Of the 170 million acres that once covered the North American heartland, less than 4% is left, and most of that is in the Flint Hills of Kansas.
Tallgrass Prairie Of the 170 million acres that once covered the North American heartland, less than 4% is left, and most of that is in the Flint Hills of Kansas. © Dave Bryan (Timeless Changes)

Places We Protect

Flint Hills Tallgrass Prairie Preserve

Kansas

Overview

This tallgrass prairie is set among low rolling hills of limestone strata that cover layers of sandstone, flint and chert. The headwaters of the South Fork of the Cottonwood River run through the preserve that was purchased in 1972 and 1973 with funds provided by the late Katharine Ordway.

This preserve contains healthy populations of big bluestem, little bluestem, Indian grass, switch grass and other plants typical of the tallgrass prairie.

Here, we also protect grassland birds like greater prairie-chicken and Henslow's sparrow which require a large and diverse area of healthy prairie for habitat. Coyotes, deer and bobcats also roam this prairie.