A man in a warehouse with tuna harvested from waters in the Pacific Islands.
Sustainable Fishing Tuna are valuable income for Pacific Island nations. © Jonne Roriz

2019 Annual Report

Pacific Island Nations Pledge New Transparency in the Tuna Market

This momentum will have ripple effects throughout the entire tuna industry.

Eight Pacific Island nations came together with support from The Nature Conservancy in April to boldly commit to full transparency in their national tuna fisheries.

The Technology for Tuna Transparency Challenge, led by the Federated States of Micronesia, is an initiative of historic proportions. For the first time ever, developing countries have committed to 100% transparency in their entire tuna fisheries by 2023 through on-board observers and state-of-the-art electronic monitoring.

For the first time ever, developing countries have committed to 100% transparency in their entire tuna fisheries by 2023.

These nations are truly ocean states with waters that sweep across the western and central Pacific Ocean. They control around half the planet’s skipjack tuna catch—the planet’s most commonly canned fish—meaning the momentum of their collective actions ripples through a global industry.

This is a huge win for the oceans and people. Better oversight means foreign vessels can’t take more than their fair share, so more revenue goes back into Pacific Island communities. And vessels can’t get away with illegal fishing or reckless bycatch of sensitive species such as sea turtles. It is long past time to bring fisheries monitoring into the 21st century—successful transparency could transform seafood sustainability in the Pacific and beyond.