2019 Annual Report

Protecting Oceans, Lands & Water

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Saving the planet’s most critical habitats.

From the grasslands of Mongolia to the Caribbean’s reefs, we help save the world’s most critical habitats.

A person riding a horse past gers and a double rainbow in the South Gobi Desert, Mongolia.
Mongolia’s federal and local governments have protected nearly 150 million acres across the country, including parts of its extensive grasslands (seen here). Now, TNC is helping the government protect even more. © Ira Block/National Geographic Image Collection
Overlooking Snake River
Overlook of the Snake River with the Teton Range in the distance, pink from the sunrise. © Keith Ladzinski/National Geographic Image Collection
Underwater coral
Coral Nursery A man attaches coral reef fragments that were grown within a coral nursery to existing pieces of coral near Bayahibe, in the Dominican Republic. © Paul A. Selvaggio
Mangroves along a shore in Florida
Mangroves Aerial view of the Nahtik Marine Protected Area adjacent to the Enipein Mangrove Forest Reserve, Pohnpei, Micronesia. © Nick Hall
Kangaroo
Red Kangaroo Red Kangaroo in the scrub of the CCB Wetland system, Australia. Red Kangaroos are a common species at the Great Cumbung swamp. © Andrew Peacock
Woman leaning against a tree holding a machete.
The Conservancy helps Xikrin women protect the Brazilian Amazon and diversify the local economy. © Kevin Arnold
Whale tail out of water.
In California TNC works with the fishing industry to reduce the threats of fishing gear to humpback whales, shown here in Monterey Bay. © Paul Nicklen/National Geographic Image Collection
Overlooking Snake River
Overlook of the Snake River with the Teton Range in the distance, pink from the sunrise. © Keith Ladzinski/National Geographic Image Collection

2019

Local Land Protection Gets a Boost

Over half a century, the Land and Water Conservation Fund—a key federal funding source in the United States for everything from national parks to local athletic fields—has left its mark in all 50 states. But its congressional authorization expired in 2015, and the fund has relied on uncertain stopgap measures. Finally, in 2019, after campaigning by TNC and partners, Congress and the White House permanently reauthorized the fund—helping to secure its future. -Dustin Solberg

Underwater coral
Coral Nursery A man attaches coral reef fragments that were grown within a coral nursery to existing pieces of coral near Bayahibe, in the Dominican Republic. © Paul A. Selvaggio

2019

Turning Coral Reefs Into Classrooms

Across the Caribbean, three new Coral Innovation Hubs launched by TNC and partners are accelerating large-scale reef restoration, with the goal of bringing millions of corals to life over the next five years. Home to state-of-the-art lab facilities, these science centers also hosted a virtual field trip that helped 171,000 students in 60 countries learn about the importance of saving coral reefs. -Jocelyn Ellis Abood

Mangroves along a shore in Florida
Mangroves Aerial view of the Nahtik Marine Protected Area adjacent to the Enipein Mangrove Forest Reserve, Pohnpei, Micronesia. © Nick Hall

2019

Protecting the World’s Mangrove Heartland

Indonesia is home to more than a fifth of the world’s mangroves, which protect coastlines, capture carbon and provide essential habitat for birds and fish. But more than 40% of the country’s mangroves have been lost. Now, Mangrove Ecosystem Restoration Alliance (MERA)—a diverse partnership that engages governments, corporations and local communities—is working to protect and restore nearly 1.25 million acres of mangroves in Indonesia by 2025, starting with the last remaining mangrove forest in the capital city, Jakarta. -Jocelyn Ellis Abood

Kangaroo
Red Kangaroo Red Kangaroo in the scrub of the CCB Wetland system, Australia. Red Kangaroos are a common species at the Great Cumbung swamp. © Andrew Peacock

2019

Saving New South Wales’ Last Wild Wetlands

In one of the biggest private conservation purchases in Australian history, The Nature Conservancy bought the Great Cumbung swamp for roughly $39 million. The area contains some of the last large wetlands in the Murray-Darling Basin, the country’s agricultural heartland, where most of the land and water resources are used for crops and livestock. A critical lifeline for water birds like straw-necked ibis and yellow-billed spoonbill, the area is also rich in Indigenous culture. -Justine E. Hausheer

Woman leaning against a tree holding a machete.
The Conservancy helps Xikrin women protect the Brazilian Amazon and diversify the local economy. © Kevin Arnold

2019

Empowering Indigenous Women to Protect the Amazon

Since 2003, TNC has partnered with eight Indigenous groups to manage 12 million acres of the Brazilian Amazon. The work has a special focus on supporting Indigenous women as forest stewards. The Conservancy has helped women of the Xikrin Indigenous People produce babaçu oil, a healthy, traditional food similar to coconut oil that can be sustainably harvested and boost the local economy. -Melisa Holman

Whale tail out of water.
In California TNC works with the fishing industry to reduce the threats of fishing gear to humpback whales, shown here in Monterey Bay. © Paul Nicklen/National Geographic Image Collection

2019

Reducing Risks For Whales

The Nature Conservancy, California crab fishers and fishery managers are making the seas safer for whales. In 2019, the group improved an early warning system to reduce the risk of humpback and blue whales entangling themselves in fishing gear. TNC also helped NOAA create online courses about how to respond to entangled whales. -Danielle Furlich

The time to innovate for nature has never been more critical.

This report demonstrates how The Nature Conservancy is answering this challenge not just in the realm of saving important habitats, but across climate change, agriculture and cities.