Dwarf horse nettle at Bibb County Cedar Glades in Alabama in United States, North America.
Dwarf Horse Nettle Image Dwarf horse nettle at Bibb County Cedar Glades in Alabama in United States, North America. © Harold E. Malde

Places We Protect

Kathy Stiles Freeland Bibb County Glades

Alabama

Our preserve in Bibb County, home to 61 rare plant species, is considered a botanical wonder.

"A Botanical Wonder," our preserve in Bibb County is home to 61 rare plant species. The Little Cahaba River, which flows through the preserve, harbors dozens of rare aquatic creatures. The site also includes Brighthope Furnace, the earliest ironworks built in the State of Alabama. This breathtaking site is truly a "lost world" of species.

The site is currently the most biologically diverse piece of land known in the state of Alabama.

What TNC is Doing

Our strategies for this preserve include the control of visitor use, restoration, prescribed burning, monitoring and inventory. Our protection goals for this site also include:

  • Completion of land acquisition at this site
  • Partnerships with neighbors and landowners
  • Improved opportunities for compatible recreational and educational uses by improving access, parking, signage, trails and other facilities
Plants

Amazingly, eight of the plant species found on the Glades have never before been known to science, including new species of rosinweed, blazingstar, prairie clover and indian-paintbrush.

It also gives life to the dwarf horse-nettle, which was believed to be extinct since the early 1800's. The small flowering plant was first described scientifically in 1834. Specimens had not been seen in the wild since 1837, until they were spotted in 1993 in Bibb County. It is only known to be found it two areas in the world, both in Alabama: along the Coosa River in Coosa County, and here.

Animals

The Little Cahaba River, which flows through the preserve, harbors dozens of rare aquatic species, including the round rocksnail and the goldline darter.

This preserve is open to the public during daylight hours. Visitors can park at the entrance gate and walk to the Little Cahaba River. Please be mindful of fragile plants. Planned events allow visitors to participate in stewardship and educational activities throughout the year.