(INTERNAL RIGHTS ONLY) Canoeists on the Altamaha River in Georgia, United States. TNC has played a role in protecting more than 79,000 acres of land in the lower Altamaha River watershed through partnerships with the many government agencies, community groups, landowners (private, public and industrial) and other conservation organizations. Photo credit: © Kathryn Kolb
WOPA060411_D105 (INTERNAL RIGHTS ONLY) Canoeists on the Altamaha River in Georgia, United States. TNC has played a role in protecting more than 79,000 acres of land in the lower Altamaha River watershed through partnerships with the many government agencies, community groups, landowners (private, public and industrial) and other conservation organizations. Photo credit: © Kathryn Kolb © © Kathryn Kolb

Places We Protect

Carr's Island Preserve

Georgia

Once the site of a rice plantation, Carr’s Island Preserve now features marshes and cypress forests.

Just west of Interstate 95 in Glynn County, Georgia, Carr’s Island represents the range of natural and cultural diversity that exists in the lower Altamaha River. Converted to a rice plantation in the 1760s, the 367-acre island is now dominated by two related natural communities – freshwater marsh and tidal freshwater tupelo cypress.

Remnants of abandoned rice fields are now tidal freshwater marshes filled with wild rice, cut grass, and beautiful false dragonhead, a threatened plant in Georgia. In some places, these marshes have reverted to the island’s original freshwater tidal cypress-tupelo forests, where sweetbay, red maple, and swamp rose grow. This combination of forest, marsh, and tidal waters supports diverse and vibrant plant and animal communities.

Donated to The Nature Conservancy in 1996 by the Jones family, Carr’s Island is managed as a natural and interpretative area and remains a special place for people to enjoy and respect some of the Altamaha River’s natural treasures. Though access to Carr’s Island Preserve is remote and possible only by means of boat, the Conservancy has established canoe trails, allowing visitor to experience the beauty and diversity of this swamp and marsh island.

Animals At Risk

Plants at Risk

  • False dragonhead

Ecosystems at Risk

  • Tiidal freshwater marsh
  • Cypress-tupelo forest

Carr’s Island is open to the public during daylight hours without a reservation. Not ADA accessible. It can only be accessed by a boat launch ramp. This boat access point is from the Wildlife Management Area.