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A hiker stands on a rocky peak looking across a cloudy valley.
Haleakala National Park A TNC staffer stands on a rock inside the creater of Haleakala National Park, Maui, Hawaii. © Ian Shive/Tandemstock.com

Stories in Hawai'i

Let's Talk Climate

If we work together, we can find solutions to climate change that are right for Hawai'i and Palmyra.

Although the majority of Americans see the effects of climate change and worry about how it will impact their well-being, less than half talk about it with friends or family with any regularity.

In Hawai‘i, 2020 polling showed that people are "extremely” or “very” concerned about the impacts of climate change—such as coral reefs dying off (73%), reduced freshwater supplies (62%), record-breaking heat (61%), coastal flooding and erosion (56%), droughts (52%) and rising sea levels (50%)—and more than 75% of residents support a range of state action to adapt and respond to these threats.

A 2021 poll showed similar results: Hawai‘i voters acknowledge climate change is happening (89%), is human caused (83%), and should be addressed as a national priority (85%). Voters ranked restoring coral reefs and forests nearly as high as healthcare and affordable housing. Voters also support transitioning to more clean energy and reducing carbon pollution (78%), and imposing a carbon fee on polluters (79%).

However, we can’t solve a problem we don’t talk about. If we want clean air, clean water, healthy food and vibrant coral reefs, we must speak up. Our choices and our voices matter. Having conversations about climate change can help spark action. 

Watch this one-minute video by Living Ocean Productions.

Let's Talk About Climate Change Climate change doesn’t have to be a bad word. We want to talk about it because we want clean air, clean water, clean jobs and healthy coral reefs. We want a more resilient Hawaii. We have the power. Our choices and our voices matter. Let’s all lead Hawaii to a better future.

The Power of Nature

The natural systems that provide our fresh water and protect our coastlines also have the power to reduce the impacts of climate change. In Hawai‘i and Palmyra, we focus on protecting these systems to ensure that life can thrive in the face of Earth’s changing climate. Reforestation efforts help mitigate the impacts of climate change by providing freshwater and preventing erosion, drought and wildfires. Our work with communities to protect and restore Hawai‘i’s reefs builds resilience for people and coasts so both can flourish. And research at Palmyra Atoll’s remote natural laboratory helps us better understand climate resilience

Three waterfalls plummeting down a vertical mossy cliff.
East Maui Waterfalls Hawai‘i’s native forests are home to rare plants and birds and are the source of freshwater for our islands. © Ryan Chang
A dense school of yellow fish with black vertical stripes in bright blue water.
Manini (convict tang) Healthy reefs like this one at Palmyra Atoll are more resilient to the effects of climate change. © Kydd Pollock/TNC
East Maui Waterfalls Hawai‘i’s native forests are home to rare plants and birds and are the source of freshwater for our islands. © Ryan Chang
Manini (convict tang) Healthy reefs like this one at Palmyra Atoll are more resilient to the effects of climate change. © Kydd Pollock/TNC

Join the Climate Conversation

To address the growing impacts of our changing climate, we need bold action. Nature can play a huge role, but it needs our help. We must start talking about it—and taking action—right now. Your support makes this work possible.

  • Contact Us

    Contact Director of Philanthropy Lori Admiral for more information. Email Lori.