Schooling jacks (Carangidae sp.) near the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. The Solomon Islands nation is ranked among the top 10 most biologicallly diverse and imperiled nations in the world. The Conservancy's conservation work in Melanesia, part of the Global Islands Parntership, has provided models for conservation that are being leveraged roadly and deeply throughout the Pacific region.  The Global Island Partnership between organizations and governments engages in high-level commitments and action for island conservation and sustainable use.
Schooling jacks Schooling jacks (Carangidae sp.) near the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. The Solomon Islands nation is ranked among the top 10 most biologicallly diverse and imperiled nations in the world. The Conservancy's conservation work in Melanesia, part of the Global Islands Parntership, has provided models for conservation that are being leveraged roadly and deeply throughout the Pacific region. The Global Island Partnership between organizations and governments engages in high-level commitments and action for island conservation and sustainable use. © © Daniel & Robbie Wisdom

Food & Water Stories

Restoring Sustainable Fisheries

Using science, collaboration and innovation to provide food for a growing population.

The Challenge:
The health of our ocean and the livelihoods of millions of people depend on well-managed fisheries. Fish and seafood are a vital source of key nutrients for more than 3 billion people around the globe and provide direct or indirect livelihoods for 10 to 12 percent of the world’s population. Despite this dependence many of our fisheries are poorly managed, leading to negative environmental, economic and social consequences.

Over 60 percent of all fisheries around the world are in decline or over-fished, with many others performing below optimal levels. Over-fishing, combined with poor management leads to an annual loss of $50 billion, globally. In addition, more than 90% of the world’s fisheries have little information to monitor their health and make informed management decisions, limiting our ability to put these fisheries on the path to sustainability.

Our Approach: 
The Nature Conservancy recognizes the tremendous impacts of mismanagement and over-fishing on ocean health and economic security. To address these challenges, we have been working ‘on the docks’ around the world for over 25 years to ensure that fisheries are managed in a way that results in sustainable fisheries, stable supplies of seafood, and biodiversity conservation. We apply best-available science, innovative tools and technologies, and work with industry partners and willing governments to support effective fisheries reform efforts.

Support Our Oceans

With your help, we can conserve marine habitat and restore the biological wealth of our oceans to benefit marine life, local communities and coastal economies.