Whip-poor-will Woods
Whip-poor-will Woods Whip-poor-will woods in fall. © Christopher Jordan

Places We Protect

Whip-poor-will Woods

Indiana

The beauty of this preserve is characterized by rolling hills, deep ravines and narrow ridges.

Why You Should Visit 

Located in Brown County, Whip-poor-will Woods' beauty is characterized by its rolling hills, deep ravines, narrow ridges and the charming song of its namesake. Ecologically, this large preserve is important because it provides a large, unbroken forests area that allows many species of birds, reptiles, and mammals that require such a space to thrive.

This preserve is owned and managed by the Indiana Division of Nature Preserves.

What to See: Plants and Animals

On the northern portion of Whip-poor-will Woods, there is an abundance of sumac, sassafras, red maple and broomsedge with some black oak and ash. At the north and east side, wildflowers showcased include showy orchids, whorled pogonia, trilliums, Mayapple, twinleaf and white, and purple violets. It is interesting to note the whorled pogonia is a rare and threatened orchid that only blooms every 10-20 years; its vegetative form may be found on this preserve. The southern portion of the woods is made of a mature climax forest that includes chestnut, hickories, beech, sugar maple, tulip, white ash and red, black and white oak.

Animal species that may be seen and heard at the woods are coyotes, gray and red foxes, eastern box turtles, deer, and Wild Turkey. Smaller mammals, snakes, skinks, and fence lizards have also been spotted. The large, unbroken forest area on the eastern boundary is critical habitat to Scarlet Tanagers, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Ovenbirds, various species of warblers.

The terrain moves from moderate to rugged and there are no established trails on the preserve at this time. Exercise caution and have fun!

For More Information

Division of Nature Preserves