Wetlands along the Mississippi River at Lock and Dam No. 25 which include the Nature Conservancy's Sandy Island Bald Eagle Sanctuary north of St. Louis, Missouri.  The Nature Conservancy works to protect the Mississippi River and its watershed through the Great Rivers Partnership which is a collaboration between a wide array of partners dedicated to the conservation of the world's great river systems for the benefit of the people and the species that depend upon them for life.
Sandy Island Bald Eagle Wetlands along the Mississippi River at Lock and Dam No. 25 which include the Nature Conservancy's Sandy Island Bald Eagle Sanctuary north of St. Louis, Missouri. The Nature Conservancy works to protect the Mississippi River and its watershed through the Great Rivers Partnership which is a collaboration between a wide array of partners dedicated to the conservation of the world's great river systems for the benefit of the people and the species that depend upon them for life. © © Mark Godfrey/TNC

Places We Protect

Sandy Island Bald Eagle Sanctuary

Missouri

Only a few miles from the St. Louis, this unique sanctuary is an accessible and reliable place to observe bald eagles.

The majority of Sandy Island Eagle Sanctuary was donated by Missouri photographer Frank Oberle and his wife Judy in 1992 as a safe habitat for bald eagles. This natural area is only miles from St. Louis, making it an accessible and reliable place to observe these majestic birds in their winter habitat.

Why You Should Visit

Sandy Island provides critical habitat for wintering bald eagles that visit this region of the Mississippi River. The Mary Chambers Wiese platform located adjacent to the preserve, provides close-range viewing (complete with mounted scope) of the eagles and other birds. Please note: The preserve is closed to the public during the months of November through March to prevent disturbances when the eagles are roosting.

What TNC Has Done

The Mary Wiese Observation Platform is located on Corps of Engineers property at the south end of Lock and Dam #25.

 

What to See: Animals

During the winter months, up to several hundred bald eagles use the preserve's cottonwood and silver maples trees for roosting. January and February are prime viewing times.

What to See: Plants

From the tall trees, the eagles scan the open water below the dam, where they dive to catch fish.

Check the local weather forecast and dress accordingly. No special gear or clothing is recommended.