Adjacent to the preserve lies Brush Creek Falls, the largest falls in southern West Virginia and owned by the State of West Virginia.
Brush Creek Adjacent to the preserve lies Brush Creek Falls, the largest falls in southern West Virginia and owned by the State of West Virginia. © D. Foster via Flickr

Places We Protect

Brush Creek Preserve

West Virginia

Brush Creek is home to many uncommon plant species, including the rare Canby's mountain-lover.

Covid-19 Update (April 6, 2020)

West Virginia’s public preserves remain open, with the exception of Ice Mountain Preserve. We ask all visitors to please follow any local restrictions put in place for your safety as well as guidance from the West Virginia Department of Health & Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), including maintaining a distance of at least 6 feet from others (social distancing).

Parking may be limited at many of our preserves. If parking areas are full, or if you find you can’t social distance at any trail or preserve, it may be best to visit the area at another time.

Thank you for helping us in our efforts to protect our visitors’ health and well-being. Together, we can each do our part to stop the spread of COVID-19 so we can continue to do the important work needed in West Virginia.


The main trail into the preserve consists of a wide foot trail that begins at a state-owned parking area.  The trail continues onto Conservancy property and leads to the mouth of Brush Creek and the river.  

A trail that parallels Brush Creek and the Bluestone River is a great place to see beautiful Spring wildflowers, migrating warblers, and the dramatic limestone and sandstone cliffs. Adjacent to the preserve lies Brush Creek Falls, the largest falls in southern West Virginia and owned by the State of West Virginia.

Plants include many uncommon species, including white cedar, Canada yew, shale barren onion (a regional endemic), and the globally rare shrub Canby’s mountain-lover. Spring wildflowers are easily found along the trail.

Migrating warblers are most abundant in late April and early May.

The preserve is scenic in all seasons. Spring, Summer, and Fall each have their own wildflower displays. Spring is perhaps best with the dramatic trillium display and many migrating birds.

What to See: Plants

Plants include many uncommon species, including white cedar, Canada yew, shale barren onion (a regional endemic), and the globally rare shrub Canby’s mountain-lover. Spring wildflowers are easily found along the trail.

What to See: Animals

Migrating warblers are most abundant in late April and early May.

The preserve is scenic in all seasons. Spring, Summer, and Fall each have their own wildflower displays. Spring is perhaps best with the dramatic trillium display and many migrating birds.

Support Our Work at Brush Creek Preserve

We're working to protect this popular destination in the Central Appalachians region of West Virginia. You can help.