salmon_power
Female Coho Salmon Female coho salmon in Thompson Creek along the Oregon coast © Michael Durham/www.durmphoto.com

Stories in Oregon

The Power to Save Salmon

Renewable power customers fund salmon restoration in Oregon

PGE Salmon Fund
PGE Salmon Fund The Nature Conservancy in Oregon is working with Portland General Electric customers to protect salmon habitat. © The Nature Conservancy

Oregon’s rivers, streams and wetlands are vital to salmon and to people—yet changes caused by agriculture, ranching, timber harvest, and urbanization have resulted in loss of critical habitat and degraded water quality.

Through the Salmon Habitat Support Fund—funded by Portland General Electric (PGE) customers—The Nature Conservancy and more than 50 conservation partners have supported 146 freshwater habitat restoration projects in Oregon, reintroducing healthy ecological processes to over 360 miles of rivers and streams and 475 acres of riparian or floodplain habitat.

“The Salmon Habitat Support Fund is a great example of the impact people can make when they take a small action to achieve something bigger,” says Zach Freed of The Nature Conservancy. “Thanks to the PGE customers who support the Fund, dozens of conservation organizations have been empowered to make positive impacts on salmon habitat and water quality.”

You can help!

If you’re a PGE customer, you have the option to donate an additional $2.50 a month when purchasing power from renewable sources such as wind. Administered by The Nature Conservancy, your donation directly supports salmon habitat protection and restoration projects across Oregon.

When you sign up to donate, you’re directly supporting the Conservancy and partner organizations such as The Columbia Land Trust, an organization that used the Fund to reconnect the natural floodplain along Hood River after it had been cut off for nearly a century by the Powerdale Hydroelectric Dam. The restored floodplain provides side channels and rearing habitat for fall Chinook, Coho, and Steelhead, as well as migration habitat for spring Chinook and Bull trout.

The Johnson Creek Watershed Council used the Salmon Habitat Support Fund to remove barriers to fish migration in The North Fork of Johnson Creek and another recent grant went to the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation for their work throughout the Willamette Basin on mussel-friendly habitat restoration to ensure the maximum benefit to salmon. 

To sign up for the Salmon Habitat Support option, contact PGE.

To learn more about Salmon Habitat Fund grant application and administration, please email Zach Freed or call 503-802-8151.