View looking out over a rolling valley of forests that extends to the horizon. A outcrop of rock dominates the foreground.
Kittatinny Ridge Overlook A valley view from a rocky outcrop on the Kittatinny Ridge © George C. Gress/The Nature Conservancy

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PA/DE Chapter Announces Additions to Board of Trustees

Two new trustees bring years of experience and leadership to their new positions.

The Nature Conservancy’s Pennsylvania and Delaware Chapter has announced two new additions to its Board of Trustees—Jenny Rose Carey and Irwin “I.G.” Burton. Ms. Carey and Mr. Burton bring years of experience and leadership to their new positions in support of TNC’s mission to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends.

“We could not be more thrilled to welcome Jenny and I.G. to our Board of Trustees,” said Lori Brennan, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania and Delaware Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. “They are both passionate about conservation, have a deep appreciation of Delaware and Pennsylvania, and bring truly unique experience and expertise with them.”

Said Board Chair Rich Aneser, “Our mission to protect the environment and tackle climate change requires diverse perspectives and strong voices.  Jenny and I.G. bring those with them, so we’re truly grateful that they are joining us to keep that mission moving forward.”

I.G. Burton is a lifelong Sussex County, Delaware resident, where four generations of his family have operated a prominent and successful auto dealership in the Milford area for more than a century. Now retired, Mr. Burton has remained active in the community, having formerly served as member and chairman of the board of directors for Bayhealth Medical Center, a Sussex County Council member, and a member of the Delaware Council on Transportation, and is currently a trustee for the University of Delaware. Mr. Burton is an advocate for managed, responsible land use, economic development, and growth.

“Being asked to serve as a Trustee for The Nature Conversancy in Delaware and Pennsylvania is truly an honor,” said Mr. Burton. “Having been involved in county land-use decisions in Delaware for the last 20 years, I have witnessed the need and struggle to balance growth and preservation. Consistently working towards achieving this balance is at the heart of The Nature Conservancy’s work and mine. I am grateful for the opportunity to serve on this board and look forward to working with TNC to impact the First State positively.”

Jenny Rose Carey is a renowned gardener, educator, historian and author, and until recently served as the senior director at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society’s Meadowbrook Farm in Jenkintown. She previously worked at Temple University for over a decade, first as an adjunct professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture and then as director of the Ambler Arboretum. Ms. Carey has been lecturing nationally and internationally for many years. She is an avid, hands-on gardener who whose gardens have been featured on the PBS series The Victory Garden, in the Wall Street Journal, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Green Scene magazine, and the Pennsylvania Gardener.

“I am honored and excited to have the opportunity to join The Nature Conservancy Board of Trustees for the Pennsylvania and Delaware Region,” said Ms. Carey. “I look forward to working with the talented staff and dedicated trustees and volunteers to further the mission of land and water conservation and mitigating the climate crisis. I love the way that The Nature Conservancy focuses on local action that ties into global impact and I look forward to contributing knowledge from my background in academics and horticulture.”

In Pennsylvania and Delaware, TNC is leading large-scale conservation programs that protect the lands and waters that are critical to the health and well-being of both people and nature. In Pennsylvania, TNC is also working to reduce stormwater runoff in cities, protect vital migration corridors like the Kittatinny Ridge, and engaging farmers and landowners to support the adoption of conservation practices. 

TNC’s work in Delaware also focuses on building resilience against climate change—including along the state’s vulnerable coastlines—to protect human communities and habitats.  More information on the Pennsylvania and Delaware chapter’s work can be found in the recently released Strategic Roadmap for 2022-2024.

The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world's toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at an unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 76 countries and territories: 37 by direct conservation impact and 39 through partners, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit www.nature.org or follow @nature_press on Twitter.