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The Nature Conservancy in Maine Announces New Director of Land Management

Eben Sypitkowski will lead TNC’s stewardship of over 300,000 acres in Maine.

view of rolling forested mountains
Resilient and Connected Caribou Mountain as seen from a clearing in Maine's Boundary Mountains. © ©Jerry and Marcy Monkman/EcoPhotography

Eben Sypitkowski has been named director of land management for The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in Maine, a conservation organization with a 65-year history in the state. Mr. Sypitkowski, a forester by training with expertise in forest management, biology, and ecology, currently serves as park director for Baxter State Park, headquartered in Millinocket.

Man smiles wearing warm clothing and standing outdoors.
Eben Sypitkowski Maine's new Director of Land Management © Eben Sypitkowski

In his new role, Mr. Sypitkowski will manage a dynamic team of professionals who are responsible for caring for more than 300,000 acres of land throughout Maine – from the remote St. John River Forest in Aroostook County, to Great Wass Island Preserve down east, to the Tatnic Hills Preserve in Wells. Together, they will lead TNC’s use of land management practices, including scientific monitoring, invasive species management, controlled burns, and community partnerships, in support of a network of conserved places that protect Maine’s biodiversity, ensure equitable access to natural places, and enhance Maine’s resilience in the face of climate change.

“We’re incredibly excited to have Eben join our team,” said Kate Dempsey, TNC’s Maine state director. “His proven leadership, land management experience, creative thinking and enthusiasm for connecting people to the natural world have had a tremendous, positive impact in Baxter State Park, and we can’t wait for him to apply them to conserved land around the state.”

Mr. Sypitkowski holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in environmental studies from Bates College and a Master of Forestry degree from the University of Maine. He previously served as a conservation easement coordinator for the New England Forestry Foundation before becoming the resource manager at Baxter State Park. Since 2018, Mr. Sypitkowski has served as the park’s director, fostering a culture of professional and proactive collaboration during his tenure.

How we take care of our natural places has never been more important than it is right now.

“How we take care of our natural places has never been more important than it is right now,” said Sypitkowski. “I’m thrilled to join an innovative team working for a future where Maine’s habitats are resilient and connected, and our relationships with the land and waters are deep and inclusive.”

“We very much look forward to growing as a conservation team with Eben’s arrival,” said Samantha Horn, director of science for TNC Maine. “As we work to meet the challenges of the climate crisis, his experience managing carbon-rich, biodiverse habitats and his expertise in organizational collaboration will add so much to our efforts.”

Mr. Sypitkowski is a licensed professional forester, a member of the Forest Guild and the Society of American Foresters, and has contributed to a number of published research papers. In assuming this role, he succeeds Nancy Sferra, who is retiring from a conservation career characterized by deep naturalist knowledge, boundless energy, and good humor after leading TNC Maine’s land management program for 23 years. Mr. Sypitkowski lives in Millinocket with his family and will begin his new role with TNC in March.

The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world's toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at an unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 76 countries and territories: 37 by direct conservation impact and 39 through partners, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit www.nature.org or follow @nature_press on Twitter.