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Nature's S.O.S.: Nature for All

Join us to learn about our recent conservation projects and the important work being done to make sure that public lands are accessible to all.

Looking up toward the tops of yellow-leaved trees in a Vermont forest.
Looking up to Trees Join us for our Nature for All webinar! © David Middleton

Overview

As climate change impacts both our human and natural communities, it has never been more important to ensure that we are conserving enough of our natural resources for both people and wildlife to thrive. Join us to learn about our recent conservation projects and the important work of ensuring that public lands are accessible to all. 

  • Host: Heather Furman, TNC VT state director

  • Panelists: Rebecca Stanfield McCown, National Park Service Stewardship Institute director, and Jim Shallow, TNC director of conservation

Register

Upon registration, you will receive the Zoom link. This will be a 30-minute discussion, which will be followed by a live Q&A. A recording of this event will be shared with registered participants after the event. 

More About the Nature's S.O.S. Series

An online and in-person event series to explore Vermont’s unique role in Safeguarding Our Species (S.O.S.) in a changing landscape. Join us for a webinar or in-person event to connect with others, make nature discoveries in your community and engage with actions that are making a difference for biodiversity and climate, here in Vermont and around the globe.

June 24 Outing: Eshqua Bog Natural Area

Join us for a guided outing at our Eshqua Bog Natural Area in Hartland, VT, led by TNC staff.

Sept. 5 Webinar: Vermont’s Secret Is in Our Soils

Join us to learn about VT’s focal landscapes and what we are doing to protect them for people and nature.

Sept. 30 Outing: Vermont’s Secret Is in Our Soils Hike at Equinox Highlands

Join us for a foliage hike at our Equinox Highlands Natural Area in Manchester, VT, led by Jon Binhammer (TNC VT director of land protection) to explore how Vermont’s soils set us apart from our neighboring states and nurture a diversity of plants and wildlife, from the ground up.