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Maryland/DC

Frank M. Ewing/Robinson Neck Preserve




Open to the Public

Yes

Things To Do

Take a self-guided audio tour View All

Get Directions

Why You Should Visit

The preserve is a birder's delight, where one finds undisturbed waterfowl habitat and a sanctuary for bald eagles.  May is the best time for birdwatching, when migration is at a peak; summer brings a proliferation of flowering plants and marsh grasses; fall brings migrating birds, highlighted by warblers and puddle ducks.

View Preserve Guidelines.  Please note: dogs are not allowed at any Conservancy preserve.

Download the Frank M. Ewing / Robinson Neck Preserve Visitors Guide (pdf)

Location

Just over 2 hours east of Washington, DC

Hours

Open year round for nature walks and birdwatching. The preserve has a nature trail.

POISON IVY ALERT

If you are highly allergic to poison ivy, we recommend that you avoid this preserve altogether.

What to See: Animals

  • bald eagls
  • osprey
  • marsh hawks
  • Delmarva fox squirrel habitat

This mature forest provides ideal habitat for the federally endangered Delmarva fox squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus).  Fox squirrels are larger and have bushier tails than common gray squirrels.  Don't be disappointed if you don't see one; they are much more elusive than our common friends.

Why the Conservancy Selected This Site

For its protection of waterfowl and bald eagle habitat, as well as its brackish tidal marsh habitat.  Established in 1977 by a generous donation from Frank M. Ewing, the 920-acre preserve is located on Taylors Island in southern Dorchester County. 

The brackish marshes of Robinson Neck Preserve are of extraordinary ecological value for wintering and nesting waterfowl, spawning fish, sediment control, and nutrient production.  Many such brackish bay marshes have been drained or filled for farmland and development.  Nearby upland forests provide an important buffer in the protection of these marshes and the entire Chesapeake Bay.

By protecting these habitats, we can help sustain the natural systems that are the lifeblood of the Chesapeake Bay.

Download an Audio Tour

Planning a visit to Frank M. Ewing / Robinson Neck Preserve? Before your trip, download our self-guided audio tour to your handheld device. It's like having a naturalist in your pocket!

Step 1: Download the Robinson Neck audio tour map. This map will help identify which audio tracks to play based on your location on the trail, so make sure to take a copy with you on your trip.



Step 2: Download and save the mp3 audio files to your handheld device. Play the corresponding track when you reach a waypoint along the trail. Listen to them all or pick & choose based on your interests!

Need a little help saving the files?  Check out our step-by-step guide!

Audio Files / Tour Stops (all MP3)

  1. Robinson Neck Introduction
  2. Tree Clearing with Pond
  3. Wildlife at the Trail Gate
  4. Ponds on Left and Right
  5. Cattail opening
  6. Start of Boardwalk / Delmarva Fox Squirrel
  7. Bench Near Pond / Human Habitation
  8. At Post 7 / Bayberry Bush
  9. Bench View at Post 10
  10. Biodiversity at End of Trail
  11. Sika deer call

 

Directions

From Baltimore/Washington:

  • Take Route 50 east across the Bay Bridge
  • Just south of Cambridge, turn right onto Route 16
  • Continue for 16 miles to the Taylor's Island bridge, just beyond Taylor's Island marina
  • After crossing the bridge, take the first left (south) on Robinson Neck Road
  • Go 2.7 miles to a grassy road on the left blocked by a cable gate
  • There is limited parking along the shoulder of the road to the left of the gate
Discussion

Have you been to this preserve? Are you thinking of visiting? See what others are saying about their experiences and add your comments below.

Add Your Comments

Time for you to join the discussion. Tell us about your experience at this preserve. What plants and animals did you see? When did you go? You can help others plan their visit when you share your thoughts. And thank you for visiting one of our nature preserves!

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