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Maryland/DC

Cranesville Swamp




Open to the Public

Yes

Things To Do

Take a self-guided audio tour of the preserve. View All

Plan Your Visit

View preserve guidelines and download a trail map.  Don't forget your binoculars! View All

Get Directions

The Nature Conservancy first began to protect Cranesville Swamp in 1960. Since then, the preserve has grown to encompass nearly 2,000 acres through land purchases and donations. We're grateful for your generous support for our efforts. Will you help us continue this work?

Why You Should Visit

A window into ice ages past, Cranesville Swamp is located in a "frost pocket," an area where the surrounding hills capture moisture and cold air that conspire to create a landscape more reminiscent of habitat found much further north in Canada.  Given Cranesville Swamp’s lush forest and wetland, it’s not surprising that it is home to an exceptional variety of animals. In total, more than 50 rare plants and animals live at Cranesville.

An information booth identifies several trails, one of which includes a quarter-mile boardwalk over the swamp. Admission is free.

eBird Observations

Location

Four hour drive from Baltimore and Washington, D.C., just past Deep Creek Lake.

View Preserve Guidelines

Why the Conservancy Selected This Site

In 1965, Cranesville Swamp was one of the first National Natural Landmarks designated by the National Park Service.  The mountain peatlands created by this rare mix of altitude, temperature, and precipitation are home to a spectacular range of plants, birds, and mammals.

What the Conservancy Is Doing Here

  • The primary threat to the unique setting of Cranesville Swamp is a warming of the local climate, causing a loss of habitat and species. The Conservancy is working to prevent a loss of species by restoring forests, managing wildlife and promoting compatible land management in the valley.
  • 1,774 acres purchased by the Conservancy since 1960.
  • Since 2002, the Conservancy has planted 13,000 red spruce and 1,550 white pines over 250 acres.
  • Volunteer Weed Watchers monitor the preserve for new weeds.
Hours
The preserve is open year-round during daylight hours.
 
Download
Before you visit, please download the Cranesville Swamp Brochure and the Cranesville Swamp Trail Guide for further information (pdf).

Cranesville Swamp Trail Audio Tour - New!

Planning a visit to the Cranesville Swamp Trail? Before your trip, download our self-guided audio tour to your handheld device. It's like having a naturalist there with you in person!

In this audio tour, Rodney Bartgis, West Virginia’s state director, and Kevin Dodge, Garrett College Wildlife professor, discuss bog plants, birds, bears and how the area will respond to climate change.

Step 1: Download the Cranesville Swamp Trail audio tour map. This map will help identify which audio tracks to play based on your location on the trail, so make sure to take a copy with you on your trip.



Step 2: Download and save each of the below mp3 files to your handheld device. Play the corresponding track when you reach a waypoint along the trail. Listen to them all or pick & choose based on your interests!

  1. Cranesville Habitat and Man's Role
  2. Red Pines
  3. Hydrology of Cranesville Swamp
  4. Powerline View
  5. Star Violet
  6. Origin of Water in Cranesville
  7. Climate Change
  8. Red Spruce
  9. Logging the Wetland
  10. Evaporation and Transpiration
  11. Similarities and Differences
  12. Roads

(All files are .mp3 and should download automatically once clicked. If you have trouble downloading, right-click each file and then select 'Save')

 

Visiting the Preserve
Cranesville Swamp Preserve is open year-round during daylight hours for nature walks and birding in designated areas. 

If you want to see, hear and smell the swamp’s plant and animal life — take a hike! There are five trails to choose from, all less than 2 miles long. There are some wet and boggy areas, so please bring proper footwear.

One of the highlights of the preserve is the 1,500-foot boardwalk, which allows for easy exploration over the wettest parts of the bog. Take your time and get a closeup look at the sphagnum moss, sundew and tamarack.

Download an Audio Tour

Planning a visit to Cranesville Swamp? Before your trip, download our self-guided audio tour to your handheld device. It's like having a naturalist in your pocket!

  • Step 1: Download the Cranesville Swamp audio tour map. This map will help identify which audio tracks to play based on your location on the trail, so make sure to take a copy with you on your trip.


  • Step 2: Download and save the mp3 audio files to your handheld device. Play the corresponding track when you reach a waypoint along the trail. Listen to them all or pick & choose based on your interests!
  1. Cranesville Habitat and Man's Role
  2. Red Pines
  3. Hydrology of Cranesville Swamp
  4. Powerline View
  5. Star Violet
  6. Origin of Water in Cranesville
  7. Climate Change
  8. Red Spruce
  9. Logging the Wetland
  10. Evaporation and Transpiration
  11. Similarities and Differences
  12. Roads

(All files are .mp3 and should download automatically once clicked. If you have trouble downloading, right-click each file and then select 'Save')  

What to See: Plants

  • The southernmost tamarack (or larch) forest in the United States.
  • Red spruce and eastern hemlock.
  • There are 19 distinct plant communities that include Sphagnum moss, cranberries, insectivorous round-leaved sundews, and other plants typical of a Canadian climate.

What to See: Animals

  • Northern water shrew.
  • State-rare breeding birds found here are the golden-crowned kinglet, alder flycatcher, Nashville warbler, and saw-whet owl.

 

How to Get the Most from Your Visit

  • Before you visit, please download the Cranesville Swamp Brochure and the Cranesville Swamp Trail Guide for further information (pdf).
  • Bring plenty of drinking water, sun protection (sunscreen, hat, sunglasses), rain gear, and bug protection. Binoculars, field guides, and a camera may be useful.
  • Pets are not allowed on Conservancy preserves or field trips.
  • Smoking is not permitted. 
  • Please do not remove any plants, animals, or rocks.
  • Wear socks and waterproof shoes. Wearing light colors will help you spot and remove ticks.
  • Please help us maintain this unique natural environment by taking home everything that you bring, including biodegradable materials.
  • Tick and Mosquito Alert: When you get home, plan to drop your clothing directly in the laundry and do a tick check before you shower. Deer ticks, the type that carry lyme disease, are about the size of a pinhead and tend to attach in hair, under ears, underarms, trunk of the body, groin, and backs of the knees. Remove them by gently pulling with tweezers and wipe the skin near the bite with a mild disinfectant. If, within 7-10 days after exposure, you experience a rash (especially an expanding "bull’s eye" rash), chills, fever, headache, stiff neck, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes and/or aching joints and muscles, contact your doctor. You can find more information on lyme disease at  www.aldf.com, or by calling the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at (404) 332-4555.
Directions

From Baltimore/DC (approximately 3.5 hours):  From either I-270 or I-70, head to western Maryland, in Hancock, take I-68 west to exit 14/Keysers Ridge and follow Route 219 south for 19 miles.  From Route 219, turn right (west) on Mayhew Inn Road, and after 1.4 miles turn left on Bray School Road.  In 1.6 miles at a T intersection, turn right on Oakland/Sang Run Road (Route 15).  After 1 mile, turn left on Swallow Falls Road and follow for 2.6 miles to a sign for Youghiogheny Mountain Resort.  At the sign, take a hard right on Cranesville Road.  After approximately 4 miles, turn left onto Muddy Creek Road and immediately park on the gravel at the corner of the intersection. Our informational kiosk with brochures, trail guides, and other information can be found here. To get to the trail head for the swamp, visitors must take a left back onto Cranesville Rd. and take the next left onto Lake Ford Rd. Take a sharp right curve in the road and stay to the right at the fork. Stay to the right at the next fork in the road, and Cranesville Swamp is 0.2 mile down the gravel road. Park in the lot.

Discussion

Have you been to this preserve? Are you thinking of visiting? See what others are saying about their experiences and add your comments below.

Add Your Comments

Time for you to join the discussion. Tell us about your experience at this preserve. What plants and animals did you see? When did you go? You can help others plan their visit when you share your thoughts. And thank you for visiting one of our nature preserves!

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