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Iowa

Knapp Prairie


More than 900 regal fritillaries, orange and yellow butterflies, have been observed in a single survey at Knapp prairie, making it one of the largest U.S. populations of this butterfly. The Conservancy harvests seeds from the plants that attract these butterflies for use in restoring other prairies in the area.

Why You Should Visit

Knapp Prairie Preserve is dominated by tallgrass prairie species adapted to deeper, mesic loess soils. Knapp Prairie is also an important prairie butterfly conservation area. 

Location

Plymouth County, 3 ½ hours northwest of Des Moines.

Size

25 acres

Conditions

The terrain is steep and rugged in places and predominantly grasslands. Expect to see snakes, insects, grassland birds and breathtaking vistas while you hike.

Why the Conservancy Selected This Site

Knapp Prairie was donated to the Conservancy by Barry and Carolyn Knapp in 1997. It is a rare example of mesic Loess Hills prairie growing on the lower portions of moderate slopes, saved from conversion to row crops or brome pasture by the tradition of cutting prairie hay.

What the Conservancy Has Done/Is Doing

This site is an important seed source for the reconstruction of lower slopes and valleys at other nearby preserves.

What to See: Plants

Plants here include: big bluestem, fringed puccoon, ground plum, heath aster, Indian grass, lead plant, little bluestem, New Jersey tea, prairie larkspur, purple prairie clover, prairie turnip, prairie violet, purple coneflower, purple locoweed, rough blazing star, sideoats grama, silky aster, snow-on-the-mountain, toothed evening primrose and stiff goldenrod.

What to See: Animals

Birds here include dickcissel, eastern meadowlark and western kingbird. There are many butterflies, including monarch, orange-margined blue, wood nymph or grayling, regal fritillary and Ottoe skipper.

Preserve Visitation Guidelines

Directions

From Sioux City:
Take Highway 12 north to County Road K18.

Go north on K18 about 3 miles to Weber Road.

Turn east and travel about 2.6 miles. The preserve is south of the road.

Discussion

Have you been to this preserve? Are you thinking of visiting? See what others are saying about their experiences and add your comments below.

Add Your Comments

Time for you to join the discussion. Tell us about your experience at this preserve. What plants and animals did you see? When did you go? You can help others plan their visit when you share your thoughts. And thank you for visiting one of our nature preserves!

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