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Julie Robinson


Julie Robinson

Fisheries Lead, Mexico and Northern Central America Oceans Program

Julie leads the fisheries strategy for the Gulf of California and the Mesoamerican Reef and intends to align science, technology, policy, finance and livelihoods into a comprehensive fisheries management program to affect both seascapes. She led the design for a national network of fisheries and biodiversity replenishment zones for Belize, co-led the development of a marine spatial plan for the Seychelles and was instrumental in the design and establishment of Belize’s largest marine reserve, Turneffe Atoll, in 2012. Julie also led the development of a 4-year data-limited fisheries assessment for Queen Conch and Spiny Lobster in the Port Honduras Marine Reserve.

In 2014, Julie was chosen to participate in the Nature Conservancy's Science Impact Project. Her project focuses on developing a global conservation team to support debt for adaptation swaps in local fisheries. As part of her project, Julie and her team worked with Belizean writer/performer, Kyraan Gabourel, to create a video with an important message to fishers and fisheries managers all across Belize. Fisheries resources are dwindling and in order for fishers to improve their livelihoods while maintaining a sustainable fishery, they need to organize themselves, diversify the fishery, improve fishing practices and seek better markets through innovative projects. Some of these projects are being spearheaded by The Conservancy in collaboration with fishing associations and cooperatives under the Fish for Life program – an initiative designed by fishers, for fishers.

Julie has worked in marine research and conservation for almost twenty years. She has extensive field experience throughout Belize and the Mesoamerican Reef and has worked on reef health and sustainable fisheries. She works very closely with fishing communities in empowering them for ownership and better management of their fishery, and to improve their livelihoods.

Read Julie Robinson's Full Biography

Julie in the News

 

Publications

2015

Cruz, S., Robinson J.S., Tingey, R. 2015. Integrating participatory planning in the design of Belize’s marine replenishment zones. GIS/Spatial analyses in Fishery and Aquatic Sciences (Vol 6). In Print.

2010

Stiles, M.L., Stockbridge (Robinson), J.S., Lande, M., Hirshfield, M.F. 2010. Impacts of Bottom Trawling on Fisheries, Tourism, and the Marine Environment. Oceana Central America.

2008

Finch, J., Garcia, C., Neal, D., Stockbridge (Robinson), J.S. 2008. Comparing Conch (Strombus gigas) and Lobster (Panulirus argus) Populations at Two Marine Protected Areas in Belize: Status and Lessons for the Future. Proceedings of the Sixty-First Annual Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute. Vol 61: 344-350.

2004

Robinson, J., Cushion, N., Coleman, R., Gomez, L., Diamond, E., Villafranco, J., Garbutt, D., Martin, L., and Muschamp, M. 2004. A Biological Study and Resource Value Assessment of the Port Honduras Marine Reserve. Toledo Institute for Development and Environment, Punta Gorda, Belize.

Julie Robinson

Fisheries Lead, Mexico and Northern Central America Oceans Program

Read Julie Robinson's Full Biography

In the last twenty years, Julie has focused her work in marine research and conservation off the coast of Belize. Among her contributions to Belize marine conservation, she completed comprehensive field work which led to the development of a National Habitat Classification Scheme for the country, She also provided the science and justification needed to achieve a national ban on bottom trawling in Belize.

In 2014, Julie was chosen to participate in the Nature Conservancy's Science Impact Project. Her project focuses on developing a global conservation team to support debt for adaptation swaps in local fisheries. As part of her project, Julie and her team worked with Belizean writer/performer, Kyraan Gabourel, to create a video with an important message to fishers and fisheries managers all across Belize. Fisheries resources are dwindling and in order for fishers to improve their livelihoods while maintaining a sustainable fishery, they need to organize themselves, diversify the fishery, improve fishing practices and seek better markets through innovative projects. Some of these projects are being spearheaded by The Conservancy in collaboration with fishing associations and cooperatives under the Fish for Life program – an initiative designed by fishers, for fishers.

Julie joined the Conservancy in 2006 where her focus was primarily as a marine program manager, building research and management capacity of local partners. Her areas of work now include building strategies on how to best align biophysical, social and economic dynamics to achieve healthy and sustainable fisheries. This area of work includes marine spatial planning, development of climate change adaptation strategies, diversification of traditional fisheries, exploration of new markets and sustainable financing. More importantly, all of Julie’s conservation work is based on consultation where she has built a long process for cultivation and building consensus amongst fishers and managers. Her current emphasis is to create successful pilots for replication across multiple geographies and to achieve impact at scale to increase fisheries sustainability, productivity and improve fisher-folk livelihoods.

Julie has a degree in Biology from the University of South Florida, is fluent in English, Spanish and Creole and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Belize Audubon Society, Belize’s oldest and largest conservation NGO.

Contact

Nadia Peimbert
Media Contact
Phone: +525556111153
E-mail: npeimbert@tnc.org

Areas of Expertise

  • Applied Conservation Science
  • Fisheries Management
  • Community Engagement
  • Spatial Planning
  • Coral Reef Health

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