A WINDOW INTO THE WOODS

Join Carmon and Jenny Briggs for adventures featuring wildlife and trail cams at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve.

Ever wondered what goes on at night in nature? Or even during the day? Carmon and Jenny Briggs have opened a window into the woods (and the prairie) with trail cams and adventure. Follow along as they share fascinating animal behavior caught on camera at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve which consists of 39,000 acres and is home to a herd of 2,500 bison.


THE SECRET LIFE OF A BISON BULL

This video is from a trail camera that was put out near a bison wallow on the preserve. The trail camera takes 9 second video clips with no sound---we strung together some of the video clips for you to see the "secret life of a bison bull". The old bull stayed on or near the wallow for about 18 hours, leaving only to get a drink of water and graze a little. It must be a very comfortable place--this buffalo wallow! He has shade from the sun and fly repellent in the dust that he rolls in. He is content. ;) There were wild turkey's feeding all around him and in one of the nighttime video's, there are some eyes glowing in the background---probably a deer. Hope you enjoy!


WHITETAIL LICKING BRANCHES

Did you know that whitetail deer communicate by "licking" a low hanging tree branch? Bucks and does will work the branch to leave their scent. A buck will rub his preorbital, nasal and forehead glands on the overhanging licking branch to leave as much scent as possible at the site and make a "scrape" on the ground to urinate in. These "scents" lets other bucks know they have competition. Animals have such cool ways of "talking" to each other.


WHITETAIL BUCKS SPARRING

Whitetail bucks sparring.....not reallly fighting, just testing the strength of the other one to see if he'll be competition during the rut.


WHITETAILS AT TALLGRASS

Here are several video clips of Whitetails at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. Some are grazing, while others are checking out the camera!


THE FLEHMAN RESPONSE

This doe urinated in front of one of our trail cameras. Watch as the bucks respond to her doing this. They do something called the "flehmen response". Bucks commonly use the flehmen response as an olfactory mechanism for identifying the reproductive state of females based on pheromones in the female's urine or genitals.



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