Our Work in Mexico: Lands

Expanding Conservation and Sustainable Rural Development

Despite their enormous value, forests are facing increasing pressures. Nature's value rarely figures in economic decisions, and we continue to sacrifice natural systems as we expand our production of food, energy and other needed resources. This deepens cycles of poverty by threatening food security, reducing access to clean water and increasing vulnerability to climate change.

Healthy forests sustain our economies, supply our water and energy, and clean our air. For farmers like Dionisio Yam Moo and Audomaro Canul, healthy forests sustain crops and livelihoods.

In Mexico, we safeguard the Mesoamerican Forest Corridor and the Maya Forest by:

Protecting forests, people and livelihoods
Transforming practices, policy and incentives to expand sustainable rural development and forest conservation
Inspiring large scale adoption of a sustainable rural development model

Protecting the forests, people, and livelihoods of Mexico and Central America.

Ernie Loewen Friesen, a 5 year old, from the Mennonite community of Santa Maria, Campeche climbs into the corn delivery truck. The Nature Conservancy works with landowners, communities, and governments in Mexico to promote low-carbon rural development through the design and implementation of improved policy and practice in agriculture, ranching, and forestry. The Conservancy is leading the initiative, Mexico REDD+ Program in conjunction with the Rainforest Alliance, the Woods Hole Research Center, and Espacios Naturales y Desarrollo Sustentable.

Transforming practices, policy and incentives to expand sustainable rural development and forest conservation.

Rancher Jose Palomo stands under the shade trees in his "silvopastoral" pasture at his ranch Los Potrillos in Becanchen, Yucatan. Palomo has adopted "silvopastoral" ranching practices, which increases cattle yields through a mixed grass/shrub/tree ecosystem. The shade lessens stress of tropical sun and helps cattle gain and keep weight. The Nature Conservancy works with landowners, communities, and governments in Mexico to promote low-carbon rural development through the design and implementation of improved policy and practice in agriculture, ranching, and forestry. Along with the creation of the Green Growth Compact tool, The Conservancy is leading the initiative, Mexico REDD+ Program in conjunction with the Rainforest Alliance, the Woods Hole Research Center, and Espacios Naturales y Desarrollo Sustentable.

Inspiring large scale adoption of a sustainable rural development model.

79-year-old Dionisio Yam Moo checks on his corn in his "milpa" personal agricultural field. He has adopted his own method of conservation agriculture planting beans high in nitrogen below his corn plants. The Nature Conservancy works with landowners, communities, and governments in Mexico to promote low-carbon rural development through the design and implementation of improved policy and practice in agriculture, ranching, and forestry. The Conservancy is leading the initiative, Mexico REDD+ Program in conjunction with the Rainforest Alliance, the Woods Hole Research Center, and Espacios Naturales y Desarrollo Sustentable.

 

To learn more about our work in the Maya Forest, watch the documentary I Am Mayan

Audomaro Canul

"We were certain it would rain between the third and tenth of May. Even if the soil was dry, we would still plant, because we knew the rains would come. Now, when it's the rainy season it doesn't rain. With this change of rains, we can't be sure of anything. Climate change is having an impact on all of us. We have to diversify because we have to survive." - Audomaro Canul, San Agustin, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico.
 

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