Congress Forgoes Undercutting Foundational Environmental Laws:
Defense Authorization Bill Free of Riders Curtailing ESA and NEPA


ARLINGTON, VA. | August 01, 2018

The following is a statement by Lynn Scarlett, Co-Chief of External Affairs at The Nature Conservancy, following the passage by both the House and the Senate of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) that does not include several proposed damaging provisions that would have undercut the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

Congressional negotiators successfully kept these proposals, which included prohibitions or delays on listing certain species and exemptions from completing environmental analysis for a broad suite of extraction projects on public lands, from the final version of the bill. The president is expected to sign this legislation:

"Congressional leaders should be commended for working together to leave dangerous rollbacks of the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act on the cutting room floor,” said Scarlett. “With passage of a NDAA bill without these proposals, the important collaborative work on the ground to find long-term solutions for conserving imperiled species, like the greater sage grouse and lesser prairie chicken, can continue.

"While we are pleased with this development, the future of the Endangered Species Act is far from secure. Repeated proposals by the administration and members of Congress to undercut or weaken the act jeopardize the long-term survival of at-risk species. While there is room for exploring ways to update and improve the implementation of the Endangered Species Act, these species-specific attacks undercut that work and make it nearly impossible to have serious discussions about ways to improve the act and its implementation. However, any changes to the act or implementing regulations must be focused on enhancing outcomes for species. The Nature Conservancy will not support changes that diminish or weaken the core protections of the Act.”


The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world's toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at an unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 72 countries, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit www.nature.org or follow @nature_press on Twitter.

Contact information

Eric Bontrager
+1 (703) 841-4822 (office)
+1 (703) 887-0559 (cell)
eric.bontrager@tnc.org

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