Preston Jimmerson walks on his family farm in Camilla, Ga., near the Flint River. Preston is bringing innovative water-saving practices to his fields through a powerful partnership made up of the Conservancy, the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Flint River Soil and Water Conservation District.
WOPA130223_D005 Preston Jimmerson walks on his family farm in Camilla, Ga., near the Flint River. Preston is bringing innovative water-saving practices to his fields through a powerful partnership made up of the Conservancy, the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Flint River Soil and Water Conservation District. © © Bridget Besaw

Food & Water Stories

Support Conservation in the Farm Bill

The Farm Bill is the most important legislation for conserving private lands in the United States.

The Farm Bill is the most important legislation for conserving private lands in the United States. About 70 percent of the land in the lower 48 states is privately owned. Nearly 900 million acres, which makes up roughly half of the contiguous United States, are managed as cropland, rangeland, or pastureland. 

The Farm Bill provides the owners of these lands with tools to protect and conserve their land and their way of life. The Farm Bill expires this year, and The Nature Conservancy wants to pass a new bill that strengthens the conservation programs to achieve cleaner water, healthier soils, improved wildlife habitats, more outdoor recreation opportunities, and increased flood control.

Bill and son Tom Parker sold their ranch's development rights to the Conservancy in 2008. Parker Ranch and two other holdings are part of 270,000 acres now protected.
Cowboys on Parker Ranch Bill and son Tom Parker sold their ranch's development rights to the Conservancy in 2008. Parker Ranch and two other holdings are part of 270,000 acres now protected. © Ian Shive