First bison calf of 2020 at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve.
Bison Calf First bison calf of 2020 at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. © Harvey Payne/TNC

Newsroom

Say “Hello” to the First Baby Bison of 2020 at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve!

Pawhuska, OK

  • Katie Hawk
    Communications Director
    The Nature Conservancy
    Phone: +1 405-503-1411

Signs that spring is officially here are popping up at the Joseph H. Williams Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Pawhuska, OK! The first bouncing baby bison was seen this week being bashful and walking closely alongside its mother.

In the spring of 2019, 411 calves were born. Preserve staff expect another 500-600 this spring to join the adult bison herd of 2,100 that roam freely at the preserve. Staff count the bison each fall at the annual bison round-up while giving them their health exams.

Consisting of nearly 40,000 acres near Pawhuska in Osage County, the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve is the largest protected remnant of tallgrass prairie left in the world! Since 1993, The Nature Conservancy of Oklahoma has proven successful at restoring this fully functioning portion of the tallgrass prairie ecosystem with the use of free-roaming bison. The herd started with 300 bison in 1993 and continues to thrive.

The Visitors Center and public restrooms at the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve are closed until further notice. The Preserve remains open for visitors to experience its beauty including the 15-mile bison loop, hiking trails and picnic area.

Get the latest on preserve updates at nature.org/tallgrass and learn more about bison history and facts.

 

The first bison calf of 2020 at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve getting a "welcome" cleaning from its mother.
Mother Welcomes Baby The first bison calf of 2020 at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve getting a "welcome" cleaning from its mother. © Harvey Payne/TNC

The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world's toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at an unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 79 countries and territories, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit www.nature.org or follow @nature_press on Twitter.