The gradient of colors in the fall in Northern California. Evergreens and deciduous plants create a beautiful gradient of color as the seasons change.
Falltime Gradients The gradient of colors in the fall in Northern California. Evergreens and deciduous plants create a beautiful gradient of color as the seasons change. © © Sevag Mehterian/TNC Photo Contest 2018

Find Local Events & Opportunities

2019 Natural Climate Solutions Symposium

California, Oregon and Washington

Nature-based climate solutions can be one of our strongest allies in the region to address climate change!

Join The Nature Conservancy and UC Davis for a 2-day (November 4-5, 2019) symposium to learn more about nature based climate solutions across California, Washington, and Oregon. Engage in a series of discussions to learn how natural and working landscapes can help the region address climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and protecting our communities from its unavoidable impacts. 

Questions? Please contact Kimberly Filosena: kfilosena@tnc.org.

Schedule:

Monday, November 4

8:00     Registration and coffee (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor)

8:30     Plenary Sessions (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor)

  • 8:30  Welcome from The Nature Conservancy and University of California Davis, Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy
  • 8:45 Opening statement from Hilary Franz, WA Public Lands Commissioner 
  • 9:00 Land Acknowledgement from Ralph “Troy” Hatch, Executive Director of Cultural Resources, Wilton Rancheria
  • 9:15 Keynote by Mary Nichols, Chair of California Air Resources Board
  • 9:45 What is the climate science telling us about impacts and opportunities for the region?
  • 11:00 Climate policy momentum in the region

12:15   Lunch: Networking and Keynote (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor) 

  • 12:50 – 1:20 Keynote, Greg Dalton, Executive Producer and Host, Climate One
  • How can we communicate effectively about the climate benefits of nature?

1:30     Concurrent Sessions - Panel Discussions 

  • Managing forests for climate and community benefits (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor)

  • Opportunities to farm for carbon, soil health and economic gains (Quorum Room, 2nd Floor)

2:45     Break

3:00     Concurrent Sessions - Panel Discussions 

  • The Power of Coastal Habitats: Using nature to protect communities from sea level rise and store carbon (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor)

  • Innovative approaches to rangeland carbon sequestration and restoration (Quorum Room, 2nd Floor)

4:15     Break

4:30     Afternoon keynote – Wade Crowfoot, Secretary, California Natural Resources Agency

 5:30     Reception (Plaza Park Ballroom,1st Floor) (No-host bar)

Tuesday, November 5

8:00    Coffee and continental breakfast (Metropolitan Terrace, 7th Floor)

8:30     Plenary (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor) 

  • Morning greeting, The Nature Conservancy

8:50     Concurrent Sessions - Panel Discussions

  • Building capacity to deliver natural climate solutions across communities and the region (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor)

  • Greening the Gray: Reducing carbon and promoting co-benefits in urban spaces (Quorum Room, 2nd Floor)

10:05   Break

10:20     Concurrent Sessions - Panel Discussions

  • Achieving climate benefit at scale: New markets and opportunities to leverage funding across the public and private sectors (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor)

  • Planning for land conservation to address climate change and advance multiple benefit (Quorum Room, 2nd Floor)

11:45  Closing keynote and plenary (Metropolitan Terrace Room, 7th Floor)

12:15   Symposium close    

**Check back frequently for program updates**

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Keynote Speakers

Mary Nichols is the Chair of The California Air Resources Board.
Mary D. Nichols Mary Nichols is the Chair of The California Air Resources Board. © Mary Nichols

Mary D. Nichols, Chair of California Air Resources Board

Mary Nichols is the Chair of The California Air Resources Board, where she occupies the attorney seat. She has served on the Board under Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. (1975-82 and 2010-18), Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (2007-2010) and Governor Gavin Newsom (2019—present.)  She also served as California’s Secretary for Natural Resources (1999-2003), appointed by Gov. Gray Davis.

When not working for the State of California, Mary was a senior staff attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council; Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Air and Regulation, in the administration of President William Jefferson Clinton; and headed the Institute of Environment and Sustainability at UCLA.

Over a career as an environmental lawyer spanning over 45 years, Mary Nichols has played a key role in California and the nation’s progress toward healthy air. She has also led the Board in crafting California’s internationally recognized climate action plan.       

President Fawn Sharp is the President of the National Congress of American Indians, which represents over 500 Tribes nationwide.
Fawn Sharp President Fawn Sharp is the President of the National Congress of American Indians, which represents over 500 Tribes nationwide. © Fawn Sharp

Fawn Sharp, President Quinault Indian Nation

President Fawn Sharp is the President of the National Congress of American Indians, which represents over 500 Tribes nationwide, and the fifth-term President of Quinault Indian Nation, a large federally recognized Tribe that directly governs 200,000 acres of coastal rain forest and 31 miles of Pacific coastline in Washington State. A human rights attorney recognized by the United Nations as one of the foremost experts on Indigenous Rights, President Sharp is a former judge, Tribal attorney, and CIA officer who has received degrees or advanced training from University of Washington, Gonzaga, Oxford University, and University of Nevada. As CEO on the Quinault Nation, she has overseen vast economic growth, turning the Nation into the largest regional employer. She is a global leader on the fight against climate change and a key contributor and leader of the I-1631 climate change initiative.

Elected in 2016, Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz protects and manages nearly six million acres of public lands in Washington State.
Hilary Franz Elected in 2016, Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz protects and manages nearly six million acres of public lands in Washington State. © Jonathan Vanderweit

Hilary Franz, Commissioner of Public Lands, Washington

Elected in 2016, Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz protects and manages nearly six million acres of public lands in Washington State – from coastal waters and aquatic reserves, to working forests and farms, to commercial developments and recreation areas. Commissioner Franz is committed to ensuring our public lands are healthy and productive, both today and for future generations. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Smith College and a juris doctor from Northeastern University Law School.

Wade Crowfoot was appointed California Secretary for Natural Resources by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2019.
Wade Crowfoot Wade Crowfoot was appointed California Secretary for Natural Resources by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2019. © Wade Crowfoot

Wade Crowfoot, Secretary, California Natural Resources Agency 

Wade Crowfoot was appointed California Secretary for Natural Resources by Governor Gavin Newsom in January 2019. As Secretary, Crowfoot oversees an agency of 19,000 employees charged with protecting and managing California’s diverse resources. This includes stewarding the state’s forests and natural lands, rivers and waterways, coast and ocean, fish and wildlife, and energy development. As a member of the Governor’s cabinet, he advises the Governor on natural resources and environmental issues. Crowfoot believes effective management of California’s resources allows communities and natural places to thrive and the economy to grow. This includes strengthening the connection between Californians and natural resources by expanding access to parks and natural places. Crowfoot is also prioritizing building California’s resilience to growing challenges from climate-driven threats, including drought, wildfire, flooding and sea-level rise. 

Greg Dalton founded Climate One at The Commonwealth Club in 2007 after traveling to the Russian Arctic on a global warming symposium with climate scientists and journalists.
Greg Dalton Greg Dalton founded Climate One at The Commonwealth Club in 2007 after traveling to the Russian Arctic on a global warming symposium with climate scientists and journalists. © Ed Ritger

Greg Dalton, Executive Producer and Host, Climate One

Greg Dalton founded Climate One at The Commonwealth Club in 2007 after traveling to the Russian Arctic on a global warming symposium with climate scientists and journalists. Today Climate One produces a weekly radio show broadcast on public stations in California and around the country. Greg also hosts a monthly TV show on KRCB TV 22 on Comcast and DirecTV.

Session: What is the climate science telling us about impacts and opportunities for the region?

Moderator:

Dick Cameron, Director of Science and Land Conservation Programs, The Nature Conservancy California

Dick Cameron is the Director of Science for Land Programs in the California chapter of The Nature Conservancy.  He leads a team that is advancing innovative research in diverse issue areas such as Sierra Nevada forest restoration, biodiversity in cities, and rapid recovery of rare species. His own research looks at opportunities to align biodiversity conservation with climate mitigation and resilience. Previously, he worked for GreenInfo Network, where he specialized in helping organizations and public agencies design and communicate strategic priorities. His academic background is in Geography with a B.A. from Middlebury College and an M.A. from University of Colorado.

Session participants:

Louise Jackson, Emerita Professor/Extension Specialist, University of California Davis

Louise Jackson is an ecologist who has worked on climate change issues for California agriculture such as adaptation to global warming, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, land use and preservation of farmland. She is an Emerita Professor/Cooperative Extension Specialist in the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources at UC Davis. She received a B.A. in Biology from UC Santa Cruz and a PhD in Botany from the University of Washington. She now lives in the Sierra Foothills and is involved in watershed issues there.

Amy Snover, Director of the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group & University Director of the Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center

Dr. Amy Snover connects science and decision making to help society prepare for the impacts of climate change. She leads innovative efforts to link climate impacts and adaptation science with on-the-ground needs of resource managers, planners and policy makers, to catalyze awareness and enabling action addressing the climate risks facing people and nature in the Northwest. Dr. Snover is Director of the University of Washington Climate Impacts Group, University Director of the Department of the Interior Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center and was recognized as a White House Champion of Change for Climate Education and Literacy in 2015.

David Marvin, Ph.D., Co-founder and CEO, Salo Sciences 

Dr. David Marvin is a forest ecologist and remote sensing scientist. His academic research focused on forest carbon, forest disturbance, and GHG flux modeling of land management under climate change scenarios. Recently, Dr. Marvin co-founded Salo Sciences, a conservation technology company that provides high resolution monitoring services and analytics for natural climate solutions. Salo uses three key tools—satellite data, artificial intelligence & ecological modeling—to identify conservation opportunities, monitor ecosystem health & predict environmental change with a mission to accelerate nature-based solutions to climate change and biodiversity loss.

Ryan Haugo, PhD, Director of Conservation Science, The Nature Conservancy Oregon 

Ryan is the Director of Conservation Science for The Nature Conservancy in Oregon, leading the Conservancy’s efforts across Oregon to develop and communicate a rigorous evidence base to drive conservation actions. Previously Ryan served as the senior forest ecologist for the Conservancy’s Washington and Idaho chapters and is also an affiliate professor at the University of Washington’s School of Environmental and Forest Science.  

Climate policy momentum in the region

Moderator:

Greg Dalton, Executive Producer and Host, Climate One

Greg Dalton founded Climate One at The Commonwealth Club in 2007 after traveling to the Russian Arctic on a global warming symposium with climate scientists and journalists. Today Climate One produces a weekly radio show broadcast on public stations in California and around the country. Greg also hosts a monthly TV show on KRCB TV 22 on Comcast and DirecTV.

Session participants:

Kate Gordon, Director of CA OPR and Senior Advisor to Governor on Climate

Kate Gordon is a nationally recognized energy expert. Gordon was appointed Director of OPR and Senior Advisor to the Governor on Climate in January 2019. Gordon was a Senior Advisor at the Henry M. Paulson Institute, where she oversaw the “Risky Business Project.”

Gordon also previously served as VP for Climate & Energy at the Center for the Next Generation, VP of Energy & Environment at the Center for American Progress, and Co-ED at the national Apollo Alliance.

Gordon earned a J.D. and a masters in city and regional planning from UC Berkeley, and an undergraduate degree from Wesleyan University.

Kristen Sheeran, Oregon Climate and Energy Policy Advisor to Governor Kate Brown and Director Carbon Policy Office 

Kristen Sheeran is the Director Falof the Oregon Carbon Policy Office and the Energy and Climate Change Policy Advisor for Governor Kate Brown.  She holds a PhD in Economics with expertise in energy and natural resources policy.  She has previously served as Oregon Director of Climate Solutions, Vice President of Knowledge Systems at Ecotrust, and is the founder of the Economics for Equity and Environment Network.  A professor of economics for seven years at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, Sheeran has written and spoken extensively about climate change and clean energy.

Hilary Franz, Commissioner of Public Lands, Washington 

Elected in 2016, Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz protects and manages nearly six million acres of public lands in Washington State – from coastal waters and aquatic reserves, to working forests and farms, to commercial developments and recreation areas. Commissioner Franz is committed to ensuring our public lands are healthy and productive, both today and for future generations. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Smith College and a juris doctor from Northeastern University Law School.

Forests: Managing forests for climate and community benefits 

Moderator:

Hugh Safford, Regional Ecologist, USDA-Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region

Hugh Safford is Regional Ecologist for the USDA-Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Region, and a member of the research faculty in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California-Davis. Safford manages a staff of Forest Service ecologists that provide expertise in vegetation, fire, and restoration ecology, climate change, inventory, and monitoring to the National Forests in the Pacific Southwest Region. The Safford Lab at UC-Davis is focused on applied ecological support to resource and fire management in California, neighboring states, and other Mediterranean climate regions.

Session Participants:

David Ford, CEO L&C Carbon LLC., Fellow American Forest Foundation 

Peter Tittman, New Forests

Dr. Peter Tittmann supports timberland asset valuation and operations at New Forests. Peter has extensive experience developing and deploying analytical tools designed to leverage large datasets and scalable computational infrastructure in the forestry, energy, and water sectors. Dr. Tittmann's work at New Forests is focused on developing analytical tools and processes that reveal financial, social and climate value of forestland to enable scaled investment.

Constance Best, Co-CEO and Co-founder, Pacific Forest Trust    

Constance Best is Co-CEO and co-founder of the Pacific Forest Trust. Ms. Best is a recognized climate action leader who works with policy-makers, communities and landowners to ensure forests are integral to climate solutions.  Dubbed a “Protector of the Planet” by People magazine, Ms. Best is a recipient of the EPA’s Climate Protection Award and CAR’s Climate Champion award for PFT’s leadership in sponsoring successful legislation, developing offset protocols and advocating for California’s inclusion of forest conservation and stewardship in the state’s historic climate change legislation. PFT also registered the first forest carbon offset project meeting the state’s high standards.   

Agriculture: Opportunities to farm for carbon, soil health and economic gains

Moderator:

Debbie Reed, Executive Director, Ecosystem Services Market Consortium

Debbie Reed serves as Executive Director of the ESM Consortium. She has focused on GHG mitigation and ecosystem services from the agricultural sector since 1997, having worked at the White House Council on Environmental Quality and in the U.S. Senate as a Senior Staff.  Previously, she held numerous leadership positions at the U.S.D.A., including special assistant to the Deputy Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics, and special assistant to the Administrator of the Agricultural Research Service. Her work at USDA included serving on multiple bi-national commissions; and as the USDA Executive Secretariat for the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 

Session Participants:

Kara Heckert, California State Director, American Farmland Trust 

Melissa Spear, Executive Director, Tilth Alliance 

Stephen Kaffka, Extension Agronomist & Specialist, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California Davis

Dr. Stephen Kaffka is an extension agronomist and specialist in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of California, Davis, and director of the California Biomass Collaborative. He advises several state agencies on biomass energy and sustainability issues in California, including the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board, and has served as an ex officio member of the state’s Bioenergy Interagency Work Group. Current biomass energy crop research includes winter annual oilseed crops like canola and camelina, sweet sorghum, sugar beets, and several manure project related to the state’s Short Lived Climate Solutions Plan.

Jenny Lester Moffitt, Under Secretary, California Department of Forestry and Agriculture      

Wetlands: The Power of Coastal Habitats: Using nature to protect communities from sea level rise and store carbon

Moderator:

Linda Escalantes, Southern California Legislative Director, Natural Resources Defense Council

Linda Escalante is the Southern California legislative director for the Natural Resources Defense Council. Linda works with public policy partners and decisionmakers to protect public health and the environment. It's her mission to empower and mobilize Latinos to engage in advocacy and activism around environmental and health issues. Latina Magazine awarded her the New Generation Award and she was also named among PODER Magazine’s 100 U.S. Green Latino Leaders. Linda is one of 12 Commissioners with the mandate to protecting and enhancing California’s coast and ocean for present and future generations.

Session Participants:

Mark Gold, Executive Director, Ocean Protection Council 

Mark Gold, the Executive Director of OPC and the Deputy Secretary for Ocean and Coastal Policy for the California Natural Resources Agency serves as a key advisor to the Governor and the Secretary of Natural Resources and directs policy, scientific research, and critical partnerships to increase protection of coastal and ocean resources in California. Throughout his career, his research focused on beach water quality and health risks, as well as sustainable water resources management. Mark received his bachelor’s and master’s in Biology as well as his doctorate in Environmental Science and Engineering, all from UCLA.

Carmen Ramirez, Councilmember, City of Oxnard

Carmen Ramírez is dedicated to improving Oxnard now and for future generations. She was elected to the Oxnard City Council in 2010 and started serving her second term in 2014. She now maintains a private legal practice focusing on Social Security Disability and consumer law matters, as well as Pro Bono assistance. For Ventura County, she serves on the Air Pollution Control District, Animal Services Commission, and Local Agency Formation Commission. She is also on the regional council of the Southern California Association of Government and is a member of its Energy and Environment Committee.

Chris Janousek, Oregon State University Assistant Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife 

Dr. Christopher Janousek is a wetlands ecologist and research faculty member at Oregon State University. He has worked for over a decade on Pacific coast tidal wetlands including restoration, plant ecology, hydrology and blue carbon. He obtained a BA from UC Santa Cruz, a PhD from UC San Diego, and has taught at UC Davis, Sonoma State University and Cal State Long Beach. 

Paper: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0027374

Phillip North, Conservation Scientist, Tulalip Tribes

After 28 years as a federal ecologist in California and Alaska, Phil North now works for the Tulalip Tribes in Washington as the Climate Adaptation Coordinator.  He started his career as a biologist watching salmon in California rivers bump their noses on dams.  This inspired him to return to Alaska where he had spent his early adulthood.  He wanted to work on rivers full of salmon.  After a federal retirement and four years of traveling the world with his family, he has now returned to the US where he has the opportunity to work under Tulalip’s treaty learning to restore and preserve the land.

Letitia Grenier, Program Director, Resilient Landscapes Program, San Francisco Estuary Institute 

Letitia Grenier is a Senior Scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute, where she co-directs the Resilient Landscapes Program. Her focus is working with partners to develop large-scale, nature-based solutions for restoring benefits provided by ecosystems against the backdrop of development and climate change. Letitia holds a Ph.D. in Conservation Biology from the University of California at Berkeley.

Rangelands: Innovative approaches to rangeland carbon sequestration and restoration

Moderator:

Meghan Hertel, Director of Land and Water Conservation, Audubon California

Meghan Hertel, Director of Land and Water Conservation, co-leads Audubon California’s conservation programs with a focus on inland water and working lands strategies including scaling bird-friendly management on farms and ranches; Audubon’s Salton Sea engagement; and Audubon’s sanctuaries. Meghan served as Interim State Co-Director in 2017, and has held various other positions including Associate Director of Public Policy and San Joaquin Project Manager. Before Audubon, Meghan worked with Resources Legacy Fund. She holds a Master’s in Environmental Science and Policy from Clark University, is an American Leadership Forum Senior Fellow, 2009 Water Education Foundation Water Leader, and 2006 Schweitzer Fellow.

Session Participants:

Ken Tate, PhD Professor and Cooperative Extension Specialist of Rangeland Science in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of California Davis

Dr. Ken Tate is Professor and Cooperative Extension Specialist of Rangeland Science in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of California, Davis. He holds the Russell L. Rustici Endowed Chair in Rangeland Watershed Sciences. Ken’s research and outreach is focused on enhancing natural resources and sustaining livestock production enterprises on rangelands. He examines plant, water, soil, and animal response to range management activities such as grazing, roads, prescribed fire, brush thinning, and restoration. More information about Ken and UC Rangelands can be found at http://rangelands.ucdavis.edu.

Chelsea Carey, Soil Scientist, Point Blue Conservation Science

Dr. Chelsea Carey is a Senior Soil Ecologist with Point Blue Conservation Science, a California-based non-profit focused on climate-smart conservation. Chelsea works with TomKat Ranch and The Rangeland Monitoring Network to conduct and share science that will support rangeland managers in sustainably promoting desired on-site and public services across the state. Her current research focuses on characterizing soil properties that are relevant to soil health and climate mitigation, and determining how management influences these properties across space and time. Before joining Point Blue, Chelsea received her Ph.D. from UC Merced and spent time as a postdoctoral scholar at UC Riverside.

Matt Cahill, Program Director for Sagebrush Sea Program, The Nature Conservancy

Matt Cahill is the Program Director for TNC’s Sagebrush Sea Program, a conservation and restoration initiative focused on threats to sagebrush ecosystems that combines efforts across six states – Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming. Matt leads protection, management, and restoration strategies designed to reverse the destructive invasive annual grass and wildfire cycle that affects millions of acres of rangeland, including research and development of novel seed technologies and seeding strategies to improve rangeland restoration outcomes. Originally from New England, Matt has been living and working in the west for the last five years. Matt lives in Bend, Oregon.

Jeff Creque, PhD, co-founder of the Marin Carbon Project and Director of Rangeland and Agroecosystem Management, Carbon Cycle Institute

Dr. Jeff Creque is a co-founder of the Marin Carbon Project and Director of Rangeland and Agroecosystem Management at the Carbon Cycle Institute.  His current focus is on management strategies for increasing carbon capture on working landscapes, including development of the farm and ranch-scale Carbon Farm Planning framework and its extension through Resource Conservation Districts and other conservation networks.  Jeff holds a Ph.D. in Rangeland Ecology and is a California State Board of Forestry Certified Rangeland Manager.

Building capacity to deliver natural climate solutions across communities and the region

Moderator:

Meta Lofstgaarden, Executive Director, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

Meta Loftsgaarden is the Executive Director for the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, coordinating an 18-member board and directing a $103 million biennial budget. She also currently serves as the Governor’s Office lead for Oregon’s 100-Year Water Vision. Throughout her career Meta has served in leadership positions that support her passion for local economies, communities, and conservation. She worked for the Natural Resources Conservation Service on partnership and policy issues in Oregon and Montana, and promoted rural economic and natural resource policies as deputy communications director for Montana’s Governor Judy Martz and communications coordinator for the Montana Stockgrowers Association.

Session Participants:

Angie Lottes, Assistant Deputy Director for Climate and Energy, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection    

Angie is the Assistant Deputy Director for Climate and Energy at the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) where she oversees the Forest Health program. Before starting with CAL FIRE, Angie worked as Biomass Program Manager for the Watershed Research and Training Center.  She holds a Master of Science degree in Environmental Systems from Humboldt State University (2014) and a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science with a focus on biology from Berry College (2009). She completed a Life Cycle Assessment for forest bioenergy systems and worked in fire reintroduction to native pine ecosystems.

Jeanne Merrill, Policy Director, California Climate and Agricultural Network

Jeanne Merrill has over 20 years of experience in agricultural, environmental and energy policy advocacy at the state and national levels. Since 2009, she has seed as Policy Director with the California Climate and Agriculture Network (CalCAN). Prior to her time with CalCAN, Jeanne worked with Michael Fields Agricultural Institute in Wisconsin, the Center on Wisconsin Strategy (COWS), Greenpeace U.S. and Pesticide Watch. She served for six years on the Organizational Council of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) and currently co-chairs the coalition’s climate change committee. She holds a B.A. in political science from U.C. San Diego and an M.S. in Land Resources from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She lives with her husband and daughter in Alameda, CA.

Marko Bey, Executive Director, Lomakatsi Restoration Project

Marko Bey is the Founder and Executive Director of Lomakatsi Restoration Project. Established in 1995, Lomakatsi is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to “restore ecosystems and the sustainability of communities, cultures and economies.” Lomakatsi develops forest and watershed restoration initiatives and programs throughout Oregon and Northern California. 

Marko has 32 years of experience in community-based ecological restoration, working throughout seven western states. Marko has provided leadership in establishing large-scale, long-term restoration agreements, covering millions of acres of forests and miles of streams.  These initiatives infuse millions of dollars and co-investments into communities, supporting hundreds of jobs and creating resilient ecosystems.  

Catherine Macdonald, North America Climate Solutions Director for The Nature Conservancy

Catherine Macdonald is the North America Natural Climate Solutions Director for The Nature Conservancy. In this role, Catherine leads TNC’s efforts to mitigate climate change through natural and working land strategies. Prior to this role, Catherine was TNC’s Oregon’s Director of External Affairs and Director of Conservation Programs where among other duties, she led TNC’s climate policy work in the state. Catherine is Vice Chair of the Oregon Global Warming Commission. She holds a Master’s from Oregon State University and received a National Wetland Award from the Environmental Law Institute for her work to conserve and restore wetlands.

Larry Epstein, Deputy Director of the Puget Sound Partnership

Larry Epstein is Deputy Director of the Puget Sound Partnership, the Washington State agency leading the region’s collective effort to restore and protect Puget Sound. The Partnership brings together hundreds of partners around a common agenda - improving the ecosystem of Puget Sound, and the human well-being of its communities.  Larry is leading the agency’s effort to increase resources for the Puget Sound recovery community though a mobilizing funding initiative. Prior to the Partnership, Larry was a Director with Environmental Defense Fund’s Oceans Program where he led sustainable fisheries management initiatives in the Mesoamerican Reef region and Myanmar.

Greening the Gray, Carbon and Co-benefits in urban spaces

Moderator:

Kathleen Ave, Sacramento Utility District

Kathleen Ave is the Senior Climate Program Manager in Energy Strategy, Research & Development at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District.  Her work is currently focused on climate readiness, natural refrigerants, Living Future development and land-based carbon initiatives. She is the co-chair of the Community Health & Resiliency Technical Advisory Committee to the Sacramento and West Sacramento Mayors Climate Commission, the immediate past chair of the Capital Region Climate Readiness Collaborative, a member of the California Governor’s Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program Technical Advisory Council and a UC Certified California Naturalist.

Session Participants:

Vivek Shandas, Urban Studies and Planning Professor, Portland State University

Vivek Shandas is a Professor of Climate Adaptation and the Research Director for the Institute for Sustainable Solutions at Portland State University. Dr. Shandas' studies the effects of urban development patterns and processes on environmental health, with specific attention to the assumptions that guide the growth of human settlements. He also serves as Chair of the City of Portland's Urban Forestry Commission, and is a Principal at CAPA Strategies, LLC, a global consulting group that helps communities prepare for climate-induced disruptions. 

Torin Dunnavant, Director of Education and Engagement, Sacramento Tree Foundation 

Torin joined the Sacramento Tree Foundation in 2017, returning to his beloved hometown after living in Los Angeles for ten years. He oversees the community programming elements of the organization, focusing on constituent engagement, behavior change, communications and strategic planning. A major facet of his work is focused lessening the disparity of tree canopies between neighborhoods and working to improve the urban forest in underserved communities through grassroots action. Previously he worked TreePeople, Friends of the River and the California Wild Heritage Campaign. He studied Political Communications and Rhetoric at San Francisco State University.

Kristen Pawling, Sustainability Program Director at County of Los Angeles Chief Sustainability Office     

Kristen Torres Pawling is the Sustainability Program Director at Los Angeles County Chief Sustainability Office, where she co-led the effort to author the nation’s most ambitious regional sustainability plan. Previously, she advocated on climate and urban planning issues at the Natural Resources Defense Council and served in the Chair’s Office at the California Air Resources Board.   She is an appointee to the Culver City General Plan Advisory Committee and to the California Climate Insurance Working Group. Kristen earned a Bachelor of Art degree in geography/environmental studies and a Master of Urban and Regional Planning degree from UCLA.

Paulina López, Executive Director, Duwamish River Clean Up Coalition 

Paulina López is the Executive Director for the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition/TAG. Paulina has over 20 years of experience working with issues of civil rights, social justice, equity, education, and diversity. She has served in community organizations to foster civic engagement in recent immigrants and has labored extensively to promote local social and environmental justice issues uniquely affecting our recent immigrant communities. Paulina has a passion for community engagement especially for underrepresented communities on issues that affect them as well the advocacy for human rights issues. Paulina holds an MA of Law in Intercultural Human Rights from St. Thomas University.

Achieving climate benefits at scale: New markets and opportunities to leverage funding across the public and private sectors

Moderator:

Ashley Conrad Saydah, Climate Policy Strategist    

Ashley Conrad-Saydah is a climate and energy policy strategist with two decades of environmental policy and management experience in state and federal government, non-profit and academic organizations. Most recently, she served as the Deputy Secretary for Climate and Energy Policy at the California Environmental Protection Agency. Ashley’s expertise includes incorporating innovative solutions in the built and natural environments to reduce climate change causes and impacts. She was educated at Princeton University and the Bren School at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she was a Doris Duke Conservation Fellow. Ashley and her family live in Sacramento.

Session Participants:

Dave Jones, Director for Environmental and Social Risk, The Nature Conservancy California 

Dave Jones is The Nature Conservancy’s Senior Director for Environmental Risk, where he is working with the insurance sector to develop insurance products which take into account the risk reduction benefits of nature or nature based adaptation to climate change.  Jones served as California’s Insurance Commissioner from 2011 through 2018.  He founded the Sustainable Insurance Forum, an international consortium of insurance regulators developing climate risk regulatory best practices.   Jones was the first financial regulator to conduct climate risk scenario analysis of insurers’ investment portfolios.   Jones is recognized as an international expert on climate risk and insurance regulation.

Jan Mazurek, Director, Carbon Dioxide Removal Fund, ClimateWorks Foundation    

Jan Mazurek, Ph.D. directs ClimateWorks’ Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) Fund. She has worked on energy and environmental policy at the federal and state level for more than 25 years. Before ClimateWorks, then-Governor Schwarzenegger appointed her to serve as Senior Policy Advisor to the California Air Resources Board (CARB). Before CARB, Mazurek was a member of the Obama-Biden Presidential Transition Team, advising on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency toxics, pesticides, and children’s health issues. Dr. Mazurek has testified on environmental policy matters before U.S. Congressional subcommittees. She holds a doctorate from UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs.

Javier I. Kinney, Executive Director Yurok Tribe

Javier I. Kinney is a Yurok Tribal citizen and is the Executive Director for the Yurok Tribe.  He has a Bachelor of Arts Degrees in History and Native American Studies from the University of California, Davis, a Master of Arts degree in Law & Diplomacy, and a Juris Doctorate from Suffolk Law School. Mr. Kinney has extensive experience advising Tribal governments with expertise in areas of strategic actions, climate change, natural resource management, gaming, mediation, negotiations, public policy, economic development, youth empowerment, land acquisition, tribal governance, philanthropic partnerships, protection of tribal cultural resources and water and law policy.

Jamie Alexander, Senior Manager, Corporate Partnerships, Ceres  

Jamie Alexander leads Ceres' work on the west coast to mobilize the private sector to align with the objectives of the Paris Agreement and limit global temperature rise to no more than 1.5ºC. In this role, she implements strategies that move companies to set ambitious emissions reductions targets, and to leverage their influence in support of strong climate, clean energy and clean transportation policies. Prior to Ceres, Jamie served as a Civil and Foreign Service Officer with USAID during the Obama administration and led an agency-wide reform effort to integrate local capacity into foreign aid programming. 

Betty Yee, Controller, State of California

State Controller Betty T. Yee is only the tenth woman in California history to be elected to statewide office.  As the state’s chief fiscal officer, Controller Yee serves on the boards of the nation’s two largest public pension funds – the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS). With a combined PERS and STRS portfolio of more than $620 billion, Controller Yee is engaged in advancing climate change investment policy and environmentally responsible corporate practices. 

Additional Resources

Forest management    

Article: "Wildfires and climate change push low-elevation forests across a critical climate threshold for tree regeneration"

Blog: Trees’ secret power: slowing climate change

Article: "Tamm Review: Reforestation for resilience in dry western U.S. forests"

Coastal habitats

Study: "Conserving California's Coastal Habitats: A Legacy and a Future with Sea Level Rise"

Conserving California's Coastal Habitats

Blog: Tapping the power of estuaries for blue carbon capture

Urban greening

OurCounty plan

Study: "Greening without Gentrification: Parks Related Anti-Displacement Strategies"

Article: "Nature-Based Designs to Mitigate Urban Heat: The Efficacy of Green Infrastructure Treatments in Portland, Oregon"

Article: "How to build a new park so its neighbors benefit"

Sustainable agriculture and climate

Report: "Triple Harvest: Farmland Conservation for Climate Protection, Smart Growth and Food Security in California"

Article: Transitioning to Sustainable Agriculture Requires Growing and Sustaining an Ecologically Skilled Workforce

Article: "Use of local greenhouse gas inventories to prioritise opportunities for climate action planning and voluntary mitigation by agricultural stakeholders in California"

Article: "Global and Local Concerns: What Attitudes and Beliefs Motivate Farmers to Mitigate and Adapt to Climate Change?"

White paper: "Adaptation Strategies for Agricultural Sustainability in Yolo County, California"

White paper: "Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change in California Agriculture"

California Air Resources Board: Natural and Working Lands

Technical report: "Evaluation of Dairy Manure Management Practices for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Mitigation in California"

Article: "Reduced nitrous oxide emissions and increased yields in California tomato cropping systems under drip irrigation and fertigation" 

Article: "Modeling the effects of local climate change on crop acreage"

Article: "Resilience in Agriculture through Crop Diversification: Adaptive Management for Environmental Change"

Article: "Climate Change Trends and Impacts on California Agriculture: A Detailed Review"

Article: "Biodiversity and multiple ecosystem functions in an organic farmscape" 

Article: "Cover crops enhance soil organic matter, carbon dynamics and microbiological function in a vineyard agroecosystem"

Article: "Chapter Four - The Potential for California Agricultural Crop Soils to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Holistic Evaluation"

Article: "Soil as Carbon Storehouse: New Weapon in Climate Fight?"

Report: "Soil Organic Carbon: the hidden potential"

Guidelines: "Measuring and modelling soil carbon stocks and stock changes in livestock production systems: Guidelines for assessment"

California Department of Food and Agriculture: Healthy Soils Program

Other additional resources

Article: "Increasing precipitation volatility in twenty-first century California"

Article: "Anthropogenic warming has increased drought risk in California"

Presentation by Louise Jackson

Presentation by David Marvin

Presentation by Ryan Haugo 

Ecosystem Services Market program and Consortium

IPCC Report: "Climate Change and Land"

US Climate Alliance Natural and Working Lands Challenge

Next10 Report: "Toward a Carbon Neutral California: Economic and Climate Benefits of Land Use Interventions"

US Carbon Mapper

USDA Climate Hubs

Chapter: "Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU)"

US Climate Resilience Toolkit

Environmental Mitigation Program (EMP)

Climate Change White Paper

Climate Programs

Yurok Tribe

Wilton Rancheria 

Quinault Indian Nation

TNC NatureVest

Contacts

TNC Climate Lead – California

Michelle Passero, mpassero@TNC.org

TNC Climate Lead – Washington

Stephanie Williams, stephanie.williams@TNC.ORG

TNC Climate Lead – Oregon

Kathleen Brennan-Hunter, k.brennan-hunter@TNC.ORG

TNC Climate Lead – North American Region

Cathy MacDonald, cmacdonald@TNC.ORG

UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment, and the Economy 

Colin Murphy, Deputy Director, cwmurphy@ucdavis.edu