(Berberis thunbergii) This plant can form dense thickets and alters the pH, nitrogen and biological activity levels in the soil, preventing native forest species from growing.
Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) This plant can form dense thickets and alters the pH, nitrogen and biological activity levels in the soil, preventing native forest species from growing. © Rachel Rogge

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Japanese Barberry Invasive Control

Virginia

We are looking for 3-5 or more volunteers for multiple dates (Wednesdays and Fridays) to help reduce the quantity of the invasive species Japanese Barberry and Multiflora Rose (and maybe some Linden Viburnum and Autumn Olive) at our Fraser Preserve in Northern Virginia.

  • January 3
  • January 8
  • January 15
  • January 22
  • January 24
  • January 29
  • February 5
  • February 7
  • February 12
  • February 19
  • February 26

Work hours are 10 a.m. — 1 p.m. For more information or to sign up contact volunteer Margaret Chatham at margaret.chatham@verizon.net.

Volunteers will need to bring their own leather gloves as barberry and multiflora rose have sharp thorns. If you have a garden fork or weedwrench and clippers, please bring them. Volunteers will be picking the red berries off this bush, collecting them in bags and digging up the plant.

Volunteers will need to be comfortable working outdoors in the weather in forested field conditions. Bring water and any snacks you’ll need.

Cancellation will occur in bad weather, but work will continue through drizzles and temperatures above freezing. Contact Margaret no more than an hour before the workday if you are unsure of the workday status at 703-785-8175, call or text (please do not leave a voicemail).

Meet at the gate/small parking area by the main kiosk—sometimes volunteers will carpool in to the camp from there.