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Upcoming Workshop at the Dye Creek Preserve

Learning About Nature With Camera Traps

Bears walking at night captured via a camera trap.
Camera Trap Bears walking at night captured via a camera trap. © TNC

Overview

Exciting activities are coming to the Dye Creek Preserve this spring, including some that have never been offered here before!

First up this season is Learning About Nature With Camera Traps, a hands-on workshop series where we will learn to use motion-activated cameras to record photos and videos of wildlife. We will read the landscape for clues of wildlife behavior, learn about positioning cameras for great footage, and check the cameras monthly to see how creatures act in their natural environment. Expect a presentation in our open-air classroom and a short hike to the camera site during each workshop.

All equipment including cameras will be provided. All experience levels are welcome, from newbie to naturalist. Recommended for ages 14 and up.

This 4-part series will meet from February to May on the last Saturday of the month. Because the workshops build on each other and we have a limited class size, we ask that you check your calendar and apply only if you can attend at least 3 of the 4 workshops. Workshop dates are February 26, March 26, April 30, and May 28.

Meet the instructors:

Chris Wemmer has decades of camera trapping experience across the world. He served as the Conservation Director of the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., where he oversaw the Conservation and Research Center, a 3,200 acre research & captive breeding facility. Since retiring he has enjoyed using camera traps to produce videos on animal behavior.

Scott Hardage is a Land Steward with The Nature Conservancy specializing in stewardship technology. In addition to coordinating public outreach at the Dye Creek Preserve, he is an avid photographer and has used camera traps to study mammal and burrowing owl activity at the Preserve.