View of the Statue of Liberty from Governors Island in the New York Harbor. As New York City sees more intense heat waves and frequent storms due to climate change, planting and tending its urban forest will help cool the air and absorb the torrents of rain. Understanding this vital role of the city’s trees, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and local nonprofit New York Restoration Project completed an eight-year project in 2015 to plant one million trees.
View of the Statue of Liberty from Governors Island in the New York Harbor. As New York City sees more intense heat waves and frequent storms due to climate change, planting and tending its urban forest will help cool the air and absorb the torrents of rain. Understanding this vital role of the city’s trees, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and local nonprofit New York Restoration Project completed an eight-year project in 2015 to plant one million trees. © Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

Find Local Events & Opportunities

Harbor, Reefs and Shorelines

New York

Backcountry + The Nature Conservancy's Reefs to Rooftops Event Series Part 3 of 3

Speaker: Michael McCann, PhD - Urban Marine Ecologist

By 2050, sea levels are expected to rise by 2.5 feet, affecting more than 400,000 New Yorkers living in high-risk flooding areas. What is the role of nature in tackling the tremendous global challenges around climate change? We’ll explore how green infrastructure, oyster reefs, and other natural features can create a healthy and resilient New York, and how our work locally can be exported to help other vulnerable coastal communities around the globe.

Backcountry + The Nature Conservancy will be providing light snacks and drinks for this event. Come by on your way home from work and learn how our partnership and presence in NYC will benefit your backyard.