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U.S. Capitol building. © Devan King/The Nature Conservancy

Newsroom | The Nature Conservancy

President’s Budget Would Undermine Conservation, Scientific Programs

Arlington, Va.

The following is a statement by Lynn Scarlett, vice president for public policy and government relations at The Nature Conservancy, following today’s release of President Donald Trump’s FY2020 budget proposal. The budget calls for sweeping cuts to key conservation, scientific and management priorities critical to the protection of our natural resources.

“The administration has again put forth a budget proposal that would undermine the conservation of our natural world. Like his previous proposals, the president’s budget would deliver major cuts to funding and staff needed to protect lands and waters, study environmental threats, reduce risks to communities from extreme weather events and improve public health.

“Year after year, record temperatures, severe storms and catastrophic wildfires remind us that our environment is changing fast. Conserving natural resources, combatting climate change, investing in science and supporting community resilience are priorities that demand increased investments.

“Ultimately, Congress holds the power of the purse. Thankfully, as was demonstrated over the past year, lawmakers have repeatedly found common ground on conservation, and we hope this commitment continues as Congress writes the next federal budget.”

The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world's toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at an unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 72 countries, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit www.nature.org or follow @nature_press on Twitter.