A coral reef in shallow water off of the Dutch island municipality of Bonaire in the southern Caribbean. This photo was entered into TNC's 2019 Photo Contest.
Thriving coral community A coral reef in shallow water off of the Dutch island municipality of Bonaire in the southern Caribbean. This photo was entered into TNC's 2019 Photo Contest. © Lorenzo Mittiga /TNC Photo Contest 2019

Cause Marketing

Investing in the Future of Coral Reefs

SHEBA® Unveils Hope Reef to Inspire Positive Change

Hidden beneath the surface of the sea, coral reefs are among the richest ecosystems on Earth and supply communities around the world with food, livelihoods and protection against environmental threats. Coral reefs benefit approximately 500 million people worldwide each day and provide habitat for 25% of all marine species. But coral reefs are also one of the most threatened marine systems on the planet.

TNC and SHEBA® brand

The Nature Conservancy and SHEBA® brand are joining forces to protect and restore the long-term health of coral reef ecosystems. The brand has created The Channel that Grows Coral where every video viewed on the channel will result in a donation to TNC to support its coral reef restoration initiatives. This is the first time that 100% of the funds from a YouTube channel have been monetized to support sustainability efforts.

Watch the SHEBA® HOPE GROWS™ videos (and the ads!) to help fund TNC's coral restoration:

The Film That Grows Coral Watch the SHEBA® HOPE GROWS™ videos (and the ads!) to help restore coral reefs and grow hope for our oceans.

Restoring Coral at Hope Reef

SHEBA® brand is furthering years of work by its parent company, Mars, on restoration initiatives, including the Hope Reef, the start of the world’s largest restored coral reefs, located off the coast of Sulawesi in Indonesia.

Drone shot of SHEBA® Hope Reef, which has been regrown to spell the word ‘HOPE’ to drive awareness; Salisi’ Besar, Indonesia.
SHEBA Hope Reef Drone shot of SHEBA® Hope Reef, which has been regrown to spell the word ‘HOPE’ to drive awareness; Salisi’ Besar, Indonesia. © SHEBA®

The reef, which can be seen on Google Earth, is built to visibly spell out the word HOPE from the seabed using restored coral. The Hope Reef story, "The Film That Grows Coral," is also featured on the channel. By the end of 2029, SHEBA® hopes to restore nearly two million feet of coral reef sites around the world.

Coral Reefs Need Help Now

A Revolution to Save the Carribean's Coral Reefs The Nature Conservancy is launching a revolution to save our coral reefs throughout the Caribbean and beyond. Joining forces with the world's best scientists, we are developing and deploying groundbreaking techniques to grow new corals and bring dying reefs back to life.

Coral reefs are one of the most threatened marine systems. Scientists estimate that unless we take immediate action, we could lose up to 70 percent of coral reefs by 2050

Maluku Islands Reef Scenic with Diver, Hard Corals, Reef fishes. © Jeff Yonover

7 Easy Ways You Can Help Coral Reefs

  1. Watch and share: Watch and share the video, “The Film that Grows Coral” to help raise funds for reef restoration.

  2. Volunteer! Volunteer in local beach or reef cleanups. If you don’t live near the coast, get involved in protecting your watershed.

  3. Visit a reef and dive responsibly: Avoid touching reefs or anchoring your boat on the reef. Contact with the reef will damage the delicate coral animals, and anchoring on the reef can kill corals.

  4. Choose a reef-friendly sunscreen: Several common sunscreen ingredients, including oxybenzone and octinoxate, have been shown to be toxic to corals. Sunscreens that use non-nano zinc oxide as their active ingredients do not contribute to coral bleaching.

  5. Make your lawncare green: You may live thousands of miles from a coral reef, but the products you put on your lawn will eventually flow into the water system. Research green alternatives for fertilizer and pesticides that won’t harm coral reefs and marine life.  

  6. Leave no trace: Don't leave unwanted fishing lines or nets in the water or on the beach. Any kind of litter pollutes the water and can harm the reef and fish. 

  7. Spread the word!: Learn more about coral reefs and educate your community. You can share information with your family and friends, as well as contact your local representatives to see what your state is doing to protect coral reefs.

  1. Watch and share: Watch and share the video, “The Film that Grows Coral” to help raise funds for reef restoration.

  2. Volunteer! Volunteer in local beach or reef cleanups. If you don’t live near the coast, get involved in protecting your watershed.

  3. Visit a reef and dive responsibly: Avoid touching reefs or anchoring your boat on the reef. Contact with the reef will damage the delicate coral animals, and anchoring on the reef can kill corals.

  4. Choose a reef-friendly sunscreen: Several common sunscreen ingredients, including oxybenzone and octinoxate, have been shown to be toxic to corals. Sunscreens that use non-nano zinc oxide as their active ingredients do not contribute to coral bleaching.

  5. Make your lawncare green: You may live thousands of miles from a coral reef, but the products you put on your lawn will eventually flow into the water system. Research green alternatives for fertilizer and pesticides that won’t harm coral reefs and marine life.  

  6. Leave no trace: Don't leave unwanted fishing lines or nets in the water or on the beach. Any kind of litter pollutes the water and can harm the reef and fish. 

  7. Spread the word!: Learn more about coral reefs and educate your community. You can share information with your family and friends, as well as contact your local representatives to see what your state is doing to protect coral reefs.

More Coral Content

Click here to learn more about TNC’s coral restoration efforts, or read the articles below:

  • searches for loose fragments of staghorn coral in Dry Tortugas National Park.

    Ray of Hope

    After years of widespread coral die-offs, teams of marine scientists in Florida are learning how we may be able to replant reefs. Learn More About Replanting Reefs

  • Scientists used aerial technologies to collect data on vital underwater habitats at Soufriere-Scott's Head Marine Reserve.

    Caribbean Marine Maps

    The Nature Conservancy and partners, using innovative technologies, developed these maps to advance ocean conservation and climate adaptation for the 44 million people who call the Caribbean home. Learn More About Caribbean Marine Maps

  • The dense and beautiful coral gardens of Coral Bay, Western Australia.

    What type of coral are you?

    Dive in and find your coral persona! Coral reefs are the largest living structures on the planet and are home to 25 percent of all marine species. Answer six quick questions to find out which coral you’re most like. Find Out What Your Coral Persona Is