Workers clear undergrowth with machetes in shade-grown coffee crops on San Agustín Las Minas coffee plantation. Villa Canales, Guatemala City, Guatemala
PLACE_HOLDER PLACE_HOLDER © PLACE_HOLDER

The Nature Conservancy in Guatemala

Guatemala

Land Conservation. Reducing deforestation and building sustainable prosperity.

Despite their enormous value, forests are facing increasing pressure. Nature's value rarely figures in economic decisions, and we continue to sacrifice natural systems as we expand our production of food, energy and other needed resources. This deepens cycles of poverty by threatening food security, reducing access to clean water and increasing vulnerability to climate change.

Healthy forests sustain our economies, supply our water and energy, and clean our air.

In Guatemala, we safeguard the Mesoamerican Forest by:

Protecting forests, people and livelihoods
Transforming practices, policy and incentives to expand sustainable rural development and forest conservation
Inspiring large scale adoption of a sustainable rural development model

Despite their enormous value, forests are facing increasing pressure.

Nature's value rarely figures in economic decisions, and we continue to sacrifice natural systems as we expand our production of food, energy and other needed resources. This deepens cycles of poverty by threatening food security, reducing access to clean water and increasing vulnerability to climate change.  

Healthy forests sustain our economies, supply our water and energy, and clean our air.

In Guatemala, we safeguard the Mesoamerican Forest Corridor by:

  • Protecting forests, people and livelihoods
  • Transforming practices, policy and incentives to expand sustainable rural development and forest conservation
  • Inspiring large scale adoption of a sustainable rural development model
Workers picking shade-grown coffee on San Agustín Las Minas coffee plantation. Villa Canales, Guatemala City, Guatemala
PLACE_HOLDER Above, a woman picks shade-grown coffee in San Agustín Las Minas, Villa Canales. © PLACE_HOLDER

We aim to strengthen nature and people against the impacts of climate change through improved agricultural practices that are compatible with forest conservation.Together with USAID, we are leading the Resilient Central America project in Guatemala.

Resilient Central America (ResCA) aims to tackle two principal challenges: food security and vulnerability to climate change. Through piloting innovative solutions and by working across different scales, this program develops new agricultural models that build resiliency to climate change, conserve natural habitats and strengthen local economies. We do this through:

  • Policy strengthening and implementation
  • Local and regional value chain linkages
  • Territorial landscape management planning

To lean more about ResCA, explore our website and brief summary.


Workers picking shade-grown coffee on San Agustín Las Minas coffee plantation. Villa Canales, Guatemala City, Guatemala
PLACE_HOLDER Above, Rene Gaspar in his coffee field. © PLACE_HOLDER

In La Igualdad, next to Guatemala's tallest volcano, Rene Gaspar works with his wife and their three children on a 3.2-acre coffee plantation. Rene has farmed coffee for his entire life. He explains that normally, nine or ten months of rainfall produces enough high quality coffee to support his family each year.

For a few years now, there has been nothing normal about the rainfall on his land. Climate change has made it unpredictable. Floods and droughts, as well as the bugs and diseases they bring, have decimated his harvests and income. Rene laments, "In 2012 I lost 75% of my production... as a result, many of my fellow community members in La Igualdad migrated to other cities in Guatemala, or up to the United States".

Rene rejoices in the fact that since TNC started working in La Igualdad, he and his family "are finally recovering our production capacity. TNC helped us think beyond the common coffee farming production plot and taught us about weather and climate information and how to prepare ourselves against climate change".


Fresh picked shade-grown coffee on San Agustín Las Minas coffee plantation. Villa Canales, Guatemala City, Guatemala
PLACE_HOLDER Above, fresh picked coffee sits in a basket. © PLACE_HOLDER

“Climate change implies challenges for food security, water security and human wellbeing. Integrated management of the landscape involves understanding people’s interactions with their ecosystems.”– Alejandro Hernández, Mesoamerican Forest Corridor Director