Xikrin people in Pot-Kro Village near Rio Bacaja. The leaders and the elders from all the Xikrin Villages met with the Conservancy for 3 days in the Xikrin Village.
PLACE_HOLDER PLACE_HOLDER © PLACE_HOLDER

Stories in Brazil

Brazil

Smart Infrastructure. Avoid, minimize, or compensate the environmental impacts of necessary infrastructure projects.

As Brazil stands poised to see major infrastructure development, The Nature Conservancy is developing innovative tools for smart infrastructure planning to protect the wellbeing of local communities and their vital economic resources.

We are reconciling social and economic development with environmental conservation in Brazil by:

  • Protecting and restoring critically important habitats
    • We safeguard ecologically important places; guiding development towards sites with the least impact on nature.
  • Transforming how we use nature to sustain ourselves
    • Through science and partnerships, we encourage innovative practices and policies to ensure that we source our energy as sustainably as possible.
  • Inspiring collective action
    • We partner with local communities and indigenous peoples, providing them with science and other tools to be the best stewards of their own resources.
 Bepnhibety Xikrin surveying restoration efforts in a forest near the Pot-Kro Village. He marks the location of Brazil nut trees in his GPS.
Bepnhibety Xikrin surveying restoration efforts in a forest near the Pot-Kro Village. He marks the location of Brazil nut trees in his GPS. Through the ethno-mapping project, 4 million acres of Xikrin sacred lands were mapped in order to protect them from deforestation and encroachment. © Unknown

Since 2000, Indigenous Peoples and The Nature Conservancy have been working together to advance indigenous-led conservation goals and land management priorities across Brazil. 

  • We are working with indigenous peoples to integrate traditional knowledge with modern approaches to landscape planning in order to enable greater leadership in deciding how their traditional territories will be managed and to have a stronger voice in policy decisions.
    • A key component of the participatory process for developing Indigenous Environmental and Territorial Management Plans (PGTAs) is ethno-mapping. The ethno-mapping process is led by the Indigenous Peoples, and is a tool for advancing their aspirations and visions and an important step in developing the PGTAs.We are working with FUNAI (the Brazilian government body that establishes and carries out policies relating to indigenous peoples) to implement these PGTAs.
      • Ethno-maps reflect and integrate indigenous values, land uses and significant features of the landscape into a spatial map. It also takes into consideration relevant policies and development opportunities, and it supports the Indigenous Peoples in making internal agreements about priorities for developing their territories.
      • Partnering with 8 indigenous lands across 13.5 million acres, The Conservancy has developed a proven approach that is now being rolled out in 34 indigenous lands.
  • To learn how and where PGTAs (ethno-mapping) work in Brazil, explore our page: facilitating the development of environmental and territorial management plans.   

Members of the Latin America Conservation Council (LACC) tour Itaipu Dam, a binational hydroelectric dam on the Paraná River located on the border between Brazil and Paraguay. The dam is the largest operating hydroelectric facility in terms of annual ener
PLACE_HOLDER Above, the Itaipu Dam, is binational hydroelectric dam on the Paraná River located on the border between Brazil and Paraguay. Thousands of infrastructure projects are slated for Brazil in the near future, and we work to minimize the impacts of these projects on the environment and local communities . © PLACE_HOLDER
  • We seek to work with different levels of government to promote and encourage investments in more sustainable development projects, ensuring that such initiatives only consume natural capital if there are significant and sustainable benefits to human capital.
  • We provide technical and scientific information to support the decisions of governments and companies and to make biodiversity considerable in the design and implementation of infrastructure projects - including recommending the suspension of certain projects.
    • We apply TNC's Mitigation Hierarchy to ensure that all energy generation, transportation and mining projects have no net impacts on nature of local communities.
      • Our Mitigation Hierarchy consists of first avoiding negative environmental impacts in the first place. If these impacts cannot be avoided, we work to minimize their impact, and finally, mitigate impacts that can be neither minimized or avoided.
      • Our scientists have also developed the Tapajós Basin Blueprint, a tool to help public and private sectors, as well as civil society, identify priority areas for conservation, restoration and economic activities in the region- guiding necessary development to sites with the least impact on nature and local communities.
        • To learn more about our work in the Tapajós River Basin, check out our Tapajós page.
        • Learn more about how we are balancing conservation and development in Brazil.
          • Read an op-ed by Mark Tercek, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Nature Conservancy and Antonio Werneck, Executive Director of The Nature Conservancy in Brazil.   

Xikrin people in Pot-Kro Village near Rio Bacaja. The leaders and the elders from all the Xikrin Villages met with the Conservancy for 3 days in the Xikrin Village.
PLACE_HOLDER PLACE_HOLDER © PLACE_HOLDER

Inspiring collective action

  • With the National Policy on Environmental and Territorial Management of Indigenous Lands (PNGATI) we are promoting the well-being of dozens of indigenous peoples' and their lands, safeguarding more than 14.7 million tons of CO2 stored in healthy forests and managed by local communities. 
    • We have trained 120 indigenous environmental agents in the implementation of Territorial and Environmental Management PLants (PGTAs) to demarcate ancestral territories and prevent against development and deforestation.
    • We are holding dozens of trainings around Brazil that empower indigenous leaders in dialogue and relationships with companies to strengthen their voices in policy decisions.
      • Watch our video to learn how we are helping strengthen indigenous voices in policy-making decisions.
      • Check out our article to understand how we are promoting indigenous leadership in Mato Grosso, Para and beyond.
Francinara Soares (Nara)
PLACE_HOLDER Above, Xikrin leaders meet with TNC in Pot-Kro Village near Rio Bacaja. We are working with indigenous peoples to integrate traditional knowledge with modern approaches to landscape planning in order to enable greater leadership in deciding how their traditional territories will be managed and to have a stronger voice in policy decisions. © PLACE_HOLDER

Francinara Soares, above, is one of the most influential indigenous leaders in the Brazilian Amazon, both for the administrative financial process of the COIAB, but also for the empowerment of women.

"For a long time, TNC has been a COIAB partner (Coodrination of the Indigenous Organizations in the Brazilian Amazon) and it supports us in all processes. When I talk about support, I do not just mean fianancial support. I'm talking about a full partnership in the processes of education, institutional and community strengthening, political negotiation, demarcation of land, knowledge exchanges, and in the discussions and definition of the National Indigenous Environental and Territorial Management (PNGATI). If not for TNC support to pro indigenous movement, all this would never have been possible."