Subscribe

Our Scientists

Matthew Durnin


Matthew Durnin

Asia Pacific Conservation Science Director

Matthew Durnin, Ph.D. The Nature Conservancy, Science Director, APCR.

Matt leads The Nature Conservancy’s science efforts in the Asia Pacific conservation region (APCR). He provides manages and supports regional conservation initiatives, assisting with creating business plans, conservation action planning, and measuring conservation success as well as helping to develop new tools, methods, and techniques that improve conservation. Matt is the APCR Efroymson Franchise Leader and supports the region’s Conservation Action Planning (CAP) Coaches network.

Since 1994, Matt has lived in China and conducted research on its wildlife. Prior to joining The Nature Conservancy, he was a MacArthur Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the California Academy of Sciences and lead mammalogist on a project cataloging the biodiversity of the Gaoligongshan area in China’s western Yunnan Province.

Read Matthew Durnin's Full Biography

Matt's Latest

Cool Green Science
Panda Eats Shoots, Leaves—and Meat?!?

Media

Mother Nature Network: Spotted: Giant panda in the wild

The Guardian: China to release six giant pandas into wild

CNN: On Xi's to-do list: Fix China's drinking problem

Publications

Durnin, M. and P. J. Palsboll, O.A. Ryder, and D.R. McCullough (2007). A reliable genetic technique for sex determination of giant panda from non-invasively collected hair samples. Conservation Genetics 8(3): 715-720 

Durnin, M., R. R. Swaisgood, N. Czekala, and Z. Hemin. (2004). Effects of radiocollars on giant panda stress-related behavior and hormones. Journal of Wildlife Management 68(4): 987-992. 

Durnin, Matthew, Hemin Zhang, Jinyan Huang. (2004). Non-invasive techniques for monitoring giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) behavior, habitat use, and demographics. In D.G. Lindburg, and K. Baragona, editors.  Biology and Conservation of the Giant Panda. University of California Press, Berkeley. 

Durnin M. (1994). Survey of wildlife resources in Ganzi Prefecture, Sichuan. Gland, Switzerland: World Wide Fund for Nature. Report nr CN0050.01/China. 13 p. 

Durnin, M. (1990). Local Land-Use Controls for Improved Coastal Resource Protection in North Carolina. School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Durham, Duke University: 80. 

Kram, Megan, Bedford Charles, Durnin Matthew, Roth Benjamin, Rokpelnis Karlis, Smith Nancy, Wang Yue, Yu Guangzhi, Zhao Xingmin, and Yu Qian. (2012) Protecting China’s Biodiversity: A Guide to Land Use, Land Tenure & Land Protection Tools 

Girvetz, Evan H., McDonald Robert, Heiner Mike, Kiesecker Joseph, Davaa Gala, Pague Chris, Durnin Matthew, Oidov Enkhtuya (in Press).Nature conservation can help herders adapt to climate change in the EasternMongolian Grassland-Steppe. In Climate and Conservation: Landscape and Seascape Science, Planning and Action 

Conference Proceedings

Durnin, M.D., D.R. McCullough, J.Y. Huang, H.M. Zhang, (2001). Estimation and characterization of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) dens in the Wolong Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China. Thirteenth International Conference on Bear Research and Management, Program and Abstracts, 13:60

Matthew Durnin, Ph.D. The Nature Conservancy, Science Director, APCR.

Matt leads The Nature Conservancy’s science efforts in the Asia Pacific conservation region (APCR). He provides manages and supports regional conservation initiatives, assisting with creating business plans, conservation action planning, and measuring conservation success as well as helping to develop new tools, methods, and techniques that improve conservation. Matt is the APCR Efroymson Franchise Leader and supports the region’s Conservation Action Planning (CAP) Coaches network. 

Since 1994, Matt has lived in China and conducted research on its wildlife. Prior to joining The Nature Conservancy, he was a MacArthur Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the California Academy of Sciences and lead mammalogist on a project cataloging the biodiversity of the Gaoligongshan area in China’s western Yunnan Province. 

From 1998 to 2001, he conducted his Ph.D. research on the wild giant pandas of the Wolong Nature Reserve in Sichuan Province. He completed his Ph.D. in wildlife ecology at the University of California Berkeley in 2005 (Dissertation: Reproductive Behavior, Ecology, and Demographic Patterns of Free Ranging Giant Panda in China’s Wolong Nature Reserve). 

Matt’s other work in China includes revising WWF-China’s Giant Panda Strategic Action Plan (2008 – 2010) and, in 1994, leading an assessment of wildlife resources in Ganzi Prefecture, Sichuan Province. Additionally, he spent two years with the Australian International Development Assistance Bureau (AIDAB) driving developmental aid programs across China. 

Previously in the U.S., Matt was an environmental consultant with Ecology & Environment and obtained a master’s degree from Duke University in 1990, conducting his thesis research on coastal zone resource management. 

His main research interests are in the areas of mammalian carnivore population biology, behavioral ecology, and conservation. More specifically, he is interested in better understanding how carnivore ecology and behavior puts them into conflict with human populations and how this understanding can be utilized to reduce human-wildlife conflict. In his research, he integrates more traditional methods of collecting behavioral and demographic data from the field (e.g. radio-telemetry and direct observation) with non-invasive techniques such as genetic tagging and camera-trapping. 

Contact

Matthew Durnin
E-mail: mdurnin@tnc.org

Connect with Matt

Follow Matthew Durnin on Twitter

Areas of Expertise
  • Asia
  • Wildlife Ecology
  • Pandas
  • Infrastructure
  • Public speaking on conservation issues

We’re Accountable

The Nature Conservancy makes careful use of your support.

More Ratings