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  • Wisconsin scientist Nick Miller starts his Nature Conservancy fellowship in the mountains above Santiago, part of the Andean range; about 80 percent of Chile is mountainous. © Francisco Solis/TNC
  • A meeting takes Nick (rt) to Lake Titicaca in Bolivia where he meets with Stephan Halloy, science coordinator for the Southern Andes, and other Southern Andes Conservation team members. © Jorge Leon/TNC
  • This rare flowering thorn tree is a typical species of Chile’s Mediterranean habitat, of which less than 1 percent is officially protected. © Rodrigo Sandoval
  • This South American grey fox makes its home in Chile’s Mediterranean habitat, which is home to more than 1,500 plant species found nowhere else on Earth. © Tom Crowley
  • Yeso Reservoir in the Maipo Basin above Santiago is one of the main reservoirs that provides drinking water to the residents of Santiago. © Nick Miller/TNC
  • Grazing by domestic animals, fire and glaciers that retreat faster than plants can recolonize all contribute to loss of vegetation and increased erosion on slopes like these in Maipo Basin. © Nick Miller/TNC
  • Domestic cows contribute to overgrazing of the high elevation wetlands, or bofedales, which could replace some of the services now provided by retreating glaciers. © Nick Miller/TNC
  • Nick (right) and his Southern Andes colleagues investigate an alpine wetland, which is incredibly diverse; the deep organic layer of this wetland stores carbon and cleans and stores water. © Maryann Ramirez/TNC
  • The Valdivian Coastal Range is home to gorgeous seascapes, temperate rainforest and many unique plants and animals. Join us in June when Nick and his family explore this beautiful place. © Nick Hall
Wisconsin
Scientist Afield in Southern Andes In the Mountains Above Santiago

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