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Wisconsin

Holmboe Conifer Forest




Open to the Public

Yes

Things To Do

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A Project of the Northwoods Land Trust. The Nature Conservancy transferred its land at Holmboe Conifer Forest to the land trust in 2007.

Why You Should Visit

This 32-acre forest is a great place to find some solitude from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. You can see an outstanding example of a mature stand of hemlocks, pines and white cedar trees that provides a home to many woodland wildflowers and songbirds.

In autumn, the birches and aspens put on a colorful display.

Location

North Central Wisconsin: in Oneida County at the southern edge of Rhinelander, near the convergence of the Pelican and Wisconsin rivers.

Hours

Open year-round, dawn to dusk.

Conditions

The loop trail is both well-defined and well-marked. Boardwalks span most wet areas. 

Why this Place is Special

Though small, Holmboe is a remnant of the forests that covered northern Wisconsin prior to the advent of the logging industry.

The uneven terrain ranges from low marsh to steep upland areas. This wide range of soils and terrain has attracted a diversity of plants and animals in a small area.

History of Holmboe Conifer Forest

The Holmboe Conifer Forest was donated to The Nature Conservancy by Frithjof Holmboe and his son, Thorvald. The Conservancy assumed full ownership and management of the preserve in 1965. It was designated as a State Natural Area in 1969 and is often visited for educational purposes.

In August 2007, the Conservancy donated the preserve to the Northwoods Land Trust for long-term protection and management.

 

What to See: Plants
  • Bunchberry
  • Canada yew: one of the few places in the state where you can see this favorite food of white-tailed deer
  • Club mosses such as the princess pine
  • Labrador tea
  • Wintergreen
  • Pennsylvania sedge
What to See: Birds

More than 23 species reside here, including the

  • Hermit Thrush  
  • Red-eyed Vireo
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak 
  • Veery
  • Warblers (Ovenbird, Black-throated Green Warbler and Chestnut-sided Warbler)

During the migratory seasons, it's possible to spot ospreys and bald eagles using the forested river corridor to feed.

Directions

From Rhinelander:

  • Travel south on Business Hwy 17 (Boyce Dr.);
  • Immediately after crossing the Pelican River, look for the Taylor Park Health Care and Rehabilitation Center (903 Boyce Dr.), first left after crossing the river;
  • Pull in the driveway along the right side of the building to the back parking lot;
  • Walk around behind building and proceed about 50 yards across grassy area towards woods;
  • Follow path to the information kiosk and then into the preserve.

From the South heading towards Rhinelander:

  • Travel north on State Hwy 17;
  • At intersection of State Hwys 17 and 47 and U.S. Hwy 8 continue north through light onto Business Hwy 17/Boyce Dr.;
  • Look for the Taylor Park Health Care and Rehabilitation Center (903 Boyce Dr.) approximately 0.2 miles on the right, before crossing the Pelican River;
  • Pull in the driveway along the right side of the building to the back parking lot;
  • Walk around behind building and proceed about 50 yards across grassy area towards woods;
  • Follow path to the information kiosk and then into the preserve.
Discussion

Have you been to this preserve? Are you thinking of visiting? See what others are saying about their experiences and add your comments below.

Add Your Comments

Time for you to join the discussion. Tell us about your experience at this preserve. What plants and animals did you see? When did you go? You can help others plan their visit when you share your thoughts. And thank you for visiting one of our nature preserves!

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