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  • 2011 watercolor of Canyon Camp on the Elwha River, 18 x 24. “Every year I revisit this pool at Canyon Camp, and I enjoy seeing the changes. Some of the rocks stay pretty much the same, and feel like old friends. Painting is an amazing way to connect with nature, and anybody can do it.” – David Dickinson
  • 2008, acrylic on wood panel, 8 x 10, Canyon Camp on the Elwha River – by David Dickinson
  • “This was on a hike in to a section of the Elwha that I had not yet seen. Thank goodness for digital photography, which allows the taking and archiving of countless reference photos.” – David Dickinson
  • Watercolor of a section of the Elwha River just below the Glines Canyon dam site – by David Dickinson
  • Elwha Rapids, 2008, 11 x 17, watercolor. “A section of the Elwha River between the dam sites, along the road shortly after entering the Olympic National Park. This section is now running a silty gray as the river flushes sediment from the reservoir above the former site of Glines Canyon Dam.” – David Dickinson
  • “I take my photos, sketches and plein air paintings back to the studio where I work out most of my final paintings. Not as exciting, but at least the mosquitos aren't as bad.” – David Dickinson
  • Watercolor of a glacial erratic along the Dosewallips River. “This rock, girded with moss, ferns and fallen leaves, has so much character that the image feels more like a portrait than a landscape.” – David Dickinson
  • Watercolor of a section of the Quinault River near the Pony Bridge – by David Dickinson
  • “There is no substitute for plein air painting (painting on location) for a landscape painter. Unfortunately, weather and sunlight can limit the painter to small-scale, quick studies. The best light is usually before 10am and after 4pm when I am usually en route to or from a site, unless I am camping there.” – David Dickinson
  • “This I believe: to truly get a sense of a river pool, one must briefly put down the camera or paints and plunge headlong into its chilly depth.” – David Dickinson
The Nature Conservancy in Washington
A collection of art from David Dickinson

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