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  • Canoe pullers set out from LaPush, on the northwest coast of Washington, to the Hoh village on one of the final days of Canoe Journey 2013, Paddle to Quinault. Indians and First Nations people came from as far as Bella Bella, British Columba, Alaska and throughout Oregon and Washington to join the journey.
  • Canoes round the rocks standing off of LaPush on one of the final days of Canoe Journey 2013, Paddle to Quinault.
  • Randy Harris, a Tlingit native and staff at the Quinault Indian Nation, was one of dozens of support staff and volunteers standing by to assist canoes in case of difficulties.
  • Canoes come ashore at the Hoh village on the northwest coast of Washington en route to Point Grenville on the Quinault Indian Nation in the final days of Canoe Journey 2013.
  • Dancers from the Quinault Indian Nation welcome canoes as they land at Point Grenville, on the Quinault Indian Nation, at the end of the Paddle to Quinault, Canoe Journey 2013. Landing day kicks off a week of celebration.
  • Each canoe that lands requests permission to enter the Quinault Indian Nation and is welcomed with ceremony and gifts.
  • A thousand or more people gathered on the beach at Point Grenville to watch the canoes landing.
  • Elder Richie Underwood, left, Guy Capoeman, holding a microphone, and Quinault President Fawn Sharp, in a traditional Quinault hat and robe, greeted each canoe on its arrival.
  • A canoe from Alaska pulled on to the beach at Point Grenville, on the Quinault Indian Nation, after many days of paddling.
  • An Alaskan canoe puller is intent on the welcome ceremony at Point Grenville.
  • Guy Capoeman, of the Quinault Indian Nation, welcomes canoes onto the beach at Point Grenville.
  • Once the Alaskan canoe is welcomed, paddlers and others hoist the canoe to their shoulders to carry it safely into camp.
  • It’s a scene of great joy as the Quinault welcome Indian and First Nations canoeists from throughout the Pacific Northwest onto their shores to begin a week of celebration marking the finish of Canoe Journey 2013.
The Nature Conservancy in Washington
Canoe Journey Keeps Culture Alive

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