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  • The marbled murrelet is a small, threatened seabird that nests in old growth forests of the Pacific Northwest. They can be found at the Conservancy's Ellsworth Creek preserve on the Washington coast. (Photo © Phil Green)
  • Marbled Murrelets spend most of their lives at sea, only coming inland to breed and nest. (Photo © Phil Green)
  • They build their nests at high altitudes on branches of towering old-growth trees such as Hemlock, Spruce and Doug Fir. (Photo © Phil Green)
  • The short, stubby-winged bird can fly faster than 40 miles an hour but it's lack of maneuverability in flight makes it a challenge for the murrelet to land on a branch. So it's really important for the forest to have openings and corridors under the canopy. (Photo © Phil Green)
  • Unfortunately, logging has caused secondary growth that blocks the bird from many old-growth stands. The Conservancy and partners are doing selective new-growth thinning to solve the problem. (© Phil Green)
  • Conservancy scientists hope this selective thinning in old-growth forests will help to revive marbled murrelet populations. (Photo © Phil Green)
  • Over the last few decades, populations of the marbled murrelet have declined steeply. (Photo © Phil Green)
  • Olympia, Washington author Maria Ruth told Nature.org: "If we’re really tuned in to what’s going on with the murrelet, we’ll realize its decline is also telling us a lot about the health of its habitat and larger ecosystems." (Photo © Phil Green)
Marbled Murrelets of Washington
Get an up-close look at this rare seabird

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