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The Ocean SAMP

The Nature Conservancy of Rhode Island is working with partners to protect sensitive ocean habitat.


July 08, 2010

The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island congratulates the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) and their hard-working staff on completing the Ocean Special Area Management Plan (Ocean SAMP) for the Ocean State’s ocean waters. This plan, approved in October 2010, gives the CRMC the authority to permit offshore development only when it does not impact important areas for sea ducks, conservation of sensitive ocean habitats, and human-use areas such as shipping lanes and recreational areas. The Ocean SAMP study area extends from Rhode Island’s southern coast to twenty-five miles offshore.

The Conservancy worked closely with CRMC staff in the last year to develop important habitat and oceanographic data sets for the Ocean SAMP. We also worked with our partners to make sure that the policies and regulations in the Ocean SAMP give adequate protection to important habitats and aggregation areas for migratory species such as whales and tuna.

While the Conservancy supports a national effort to increase renewable energy sources, we’re also working with agencies like CRMC to make sure that new energy development is done in a way that avoids impacts to important species and habitats. We applaud CRMC and their staff for promoting ecosystem-based management in the Ocean SAMP, and we look forward to working closely with them in the future to ensure that the permitting, construction, and operations of offshore development does not harm our marine environment.

For more information on how the Conservancy is working to plan for ocean uses across the country and around the world, visit our Global Marine Initiative.

For detailed information on the Ocean SAMP visit: Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan 


The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends. The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide. Visit The Nature Conservancy on the Web at www.nature.org

Contact information

Kevin Essington
Director of Government Relations & Communications
401-331-7110, ext.24

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