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Faces of Conservation

Q & A with Rob DiSimone

Still in his thirties, Rob DiSimone is already thinking about ways he can support The Nature Conservancy years down the road. The Conservancy’s Legacy Club offers a way for him to support conservation in his later years while enjoying a tax-advantaged cash flow.

We sat down with Rob to learn more about his motivation and approach to conservation.

“I want future generations to have a fully functioning natural world and to still be able to experience the beauty, wonder, joy, and peace that interacting with the natural world can impart.”
--Rob DiSimone, East Norriton, Montgomery County
 

nature.org:

How did you become interested in conservation causes?

Rob DiSimone:

I was always outside with my friends when growing up exploring the woods, fields and other natural areas. Most of those places are now paved over as housing developments and strip malls today. I also spent a lot of time visiting the zoo, and it bothered me to know that some of the animals I was admiring were nearly extinct in nature. I knew back in high school in the late '80s that it would take a concerted effort to preserve and maintain what natural legacy we still have.

nature.org:

Tell us a little bit about your professional background.

Rob DiSimone:

I'm just a regular, everyday person—not rich or famous. I attended local colleges – Ursinus College, in Collegeville, as an undergraduate, and Drexel University, in Philadelphia, for my graduate degree, which fostered a strong appreciation for a multidisciplinary approach toward life. I have a professional job with most of my background being in the IT and financial areas at mostly large Fortune 500 corporations.

nature.org:

Why do you support The Nature Conservancy?

Rob DiSimone:

I like the fact that the Conservancy addresses conservation issues on multiple levels and uses many different strategies to reach its goals. It isn't an anti-people or anti-business organization. It recognizes the need to be inclusive in order to get comprehensive, workable solutions to conservation issues. And I like its broad scope in addressing conservation issues that encompasses everything from ecosystem-focused efforts like the Great Bear Rainforest campaign, to individual species like the burying beetles on Block Island. It takes a holistic approach toward conservation that sees people and business as partners in its efforts and not adversaries.

nature.org:

What Conservancy projects do you believe to be the most interesting and/or important?

Rob DiSimone:

I've supported a number of Conservancy initiatives over the years. I think every little bit of effort helps and that individual efforts combined can have a big impact on conserving ecosystems on a macro scale.

nature.org:

As one of the Conservancy’s younger members, what can you tell us about your approach to supporting its work?

Rob DiSimone:

I'm in my thirties and have been lucky and blessed to have remained gainfully employed since college. Given today's unstable markets and disappearing corporate pensions, I liked the idea of the Legacy Club deferred annuity as an additional tax-advantaged stream of cash flow in my older years. And I like that I’ll be able to continue making a difference after I'm gone; I want future generations to have a fully functioning natural world and to still be able to experience the beauty, wonder, joy, and peace that interacting with the natural world can impart.


 

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