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  • This Chukar and its chick are going in for the close-up! Chukars have a keen sense for water and have been found getting water in mine shafts over 10 feet below the ground.
  • This little black bear cub cools off and searches for food in one of Zumwalt's many streams. Did you know cubs will stay with their mothers for about two years?
  • While the cub's in the creek, this adult bear checks out another source of food.
  • This bobcat has some "huuungry eyes." Did you know bobcats are named for their "bobbed" tails?
  • These wild turkeys are truly a little wild. Often times wild turkeys will fight to assert dominance within the flock.
  • Smile, Mr. Coyote! You're on candid camera! Here's a fun fact: coyotes have a very developed sense of smell, which they use to find food and avoid dangerous predators.
  • What do you think--an elk's version of "Ring Around the Rosy?" The bull (male) elk here has nice antlers, which could reach 4 ft. above its head, bringing his total height to a towering 9 ft!
  • "You lookin' at me?" Though their eyes are fierce, cougars cannot roar. Instead, the large feline purrs like a house cat.
  • I spy a mountain cottontail. Do you see it? They're quite small, measuring 13 to 15 inches long and weighing between 1.5 to 2.6 lbs.
  • And, the show stopper: the wolf. For the first time in decades, wolves are back at Zumwalt Prairie.
Zumwalt Prairie Wildlife
Trail cameras installed across Zumwalt Prairie have captured quite the diversity of life.

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