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  • The Nature Conservancy is working to restore floodplain forests and reconnect floodplains on Conservancy-owned agricultural properties along the Neversink River.
  • This phase of the project, partially funded by Trout Unlimited via funds from the Millennium Pipeline Stream Improvement Fund, focuses on the floodplain forest around Spring Brook, a tributary to the Neversink River.
  • Spring Brook, a groundwater-fed stream, is increasingly “captured” by the Neversink during floods, which increases sedimentation and damage to the riparian buffer. Here, volunteers from Trout Unlimited install fencing to protect trees.
  • A more substantial floodplain forest around the spring will help lower water velocities and improve water quality by increasing sedimentation onto the floodplain instead of within the channel.
  • Conservation scientist Becky Shirer reviews the site plan with Union College Professor Jeff Corwin upon whose research the restoration strategy is based.
  • Nature Conservancy staff from New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania plant 300+ trees at Spring Brook, a tributary of the Neversink River.
  • Trees are planted in clusters rather than rows, which helps attract birds and other seed-dispersing wildlife. This results in new seedlings that better mimics the composition and distribution of naturally occurring forests.
  • Additional tree planting and restoration work is scheduled for the fall. The Spring Brook restoration is the first phase of a larger plan for restoring all of the Conservancy’s Neversink floodplains over the next several years.
Floodplain Forest Restoration
We're working to restore floodplain forests and reconnect floodplains on Conservancy-owned former agricultural properties along the Neversink River.

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